6 trends changing the way city dwellers live

Across the cultural grid, from food to retail to transportation, America's urban areas are already undergoing a major metamorphosis. 

February 23, 2015 |

By 2050, it is estimated that 70% of the world's population will live in cities. But as society and technology change, so will the urban landscape—and our metropolitan future will be quite different from current cities, according to Fast Company and a panel of design experts.

Across the cultural grid, from food to retail to transportation, America's urban areas are already undergoing a major metamorphosis. Here are the six major trends shaping our cities, from Fast Company:

1. The "sharing economy" will apply to housing, too. The line between public and private spaces will continue to blur as people move into a wider range of spaces with shared kitchens and living rooms, while renting or owning their own bedrooms and bathrooms. 

2. Restaurants will double as living rooms. City populations are only getting more densely packed, meaning that living space is at a premium. As homes shrink, restaurants will become not just a place to eat, but needed space for socializing.

3. Your office will look like a library. Every day, it grows easier to work from home. As a result, employees have begun to expect workspaces more comfortable, socially-oriented spaces when they do go into the office, and this is changing how offices are designed.

4. The big-box store will be on the block, but you won't need to go. Big-box retailers such as Walmart and Target are moving into the city, but shopping is slowly booming more automated—so you may simply be able to bring the store home with you.

5. Your health will become a retail product. More healthcare facilities are mimicking retail locations in their style, and health is becoming a consideration for all types of design and building projects. 

6. Infrastructure and transportation. Technology will quicken the pace of infrastructure and transportation innovation, making intercity travel faster and safer.

Read the full article at Fast Company.

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