Architects propose sustainable ‘vertical city’ in the Sahara

Designers aim to make the 1,476-foot tower sustainable, relying on rainwater collection, solar power, and geothermal energy.

April 22, 2015 |
Architects propose sustainable ‘vertical city’ in Sahara

Agriculture will be planted in a central tower inside the main structure, so that produce is protected from the harsh desert conditions. Renderings courtesy OXO Architectes

Building in the Sahara seems to be in the minds of many French architects lately. Aside from Parisian practice XTU Architects’ sand-and-bubble building method for shelters in one of the world’s most inhospitable landscapes, OXO Architectes and Nicolas Laisné Associés—both also from the greater Paris area—revealed their own proposal for the Sahara, a futuristic mixed-use tower called The City Sand Tower, Gizmag reports.

Relying on rainwater collection, solar power, and geothermal energy, the designers aim to make this so-called “vertical city” a sustainable one. The project description says that the building will be 1,476 feet with a total floor space of 192 acres.

According to renderings released by OXO Architectes, agriculture will be planted in a central tower inside the main structure, so that produce is protected from the harsh desert conditions.

Around 22% of the structure’s space will be allocated to office space, 17.5% for hotel space, 15% for housing, and the remaining available space for a shopping center, sports area, museum, spa, dining locations, and conference rooms. The cherry on top is a meteorological observatory and a heliport.

The firms said they imagine the project to start construction in 2025, with construction phased over 50 years, Gizmag reports.

Read the full story at Gizmag.

 

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