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Shanghai’s Starbucks Greener Store Lab is the first RESET-certified store for material circulation in the world

Sustainability

Shanghai’s Starbucks Greener Store Lab is the first RESET-certified store for material circulation in the world

The store is inspired by the city of Shanghai and its waste management goals.


By David Malone, Managing Editor | November 16, 2021
Starbucks Greener Store Lab exterior
Images courtesy RESET

The Shanghai Starbucks Greener Store Lab is a new concept that serves as a lab focused on circularity, meaning the elimination of waste in both store construction and operations.

The project team set a goal of ensuring that approximately 50% of the building materials could be recycled or biodegraded at the end of the store’s life. Working with the RESET Materials Standard as the framework for quantification and auditing, the project team achieved this 50% goal. Circularity strategies included the creation of a modular bar and back-of-house system that can be easily dismantled and reassembled.

Starbucks Greener Store Lab interior

Waste audits were conducted within current Starbucks Reserve Stores to quantify the success rate of the existing waste sorting program. The audits identified opportunities to optimize results via design, such as guiding users to better separate waste into organics, recyclables, and residuals. Other circularity initiatives include affordable reusable cups and Starbucks green aprons made from recycled PET bottles via advanced plastic-to-textile technologies.

Smart Internet of Things technologies are used to better manage air conditioning and lighting, reducing carbon emissions from operations by around 15% compared to a regular Starbucks store of the same size. The store is also the first Starbucks on the Chinese mainland to be powered by renewable energy purchased through a nationally certified platform.

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