National Fire Protection Association drops ban on glass boarding bridges

U.S. airports can now use more aesthetically pleasing building-to-plane links.

December 04, 2015 |
National Fire Protection Association drops ban on glass boarding bridges

Photo: Leonard G./Wikimedia Commons

The National Fire Protection Association has dropped its ban on glass boarding bridges. Most airports can now use bridges built using glass, opening up a new experience for air travelers.

Glass bridges are expected to be adopted widely by local safety officials throughout the country and provide a fresh alternative to airport designers, said Randy Pope, chairman of the NFPA task force that recommended dropping the ban on glass.

Previously, the only glass endorsed for use in boarding bridges by the NFPA code was limited to the control cab, from which the operator positions the bridge at the aircraft.

“In Europe and Canada, they’ve used glass boarding bridges for years because they offer great views and are much more aesthetically pleasing than the boxes that are prevalent at U.S. airport terminals,” Pope said. “While glass can be more expensive, it has significant environmental advantages, so I think it will receive more consideration right away."

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