Young Millennials likely to return home

Also known as Boomerang Millennials, this generation is likely to move out of their parents’ home, return, and then leave again. 

February 17, 2015 |
Returning home: Millennials moving back in with their parents

Ninety percent of individuals born between 1980 and 1984 and who hold a Bachelor’s degree left home before they were 27 years hold. However, half of this group later returned to their parents’ home, according to a study by the National Longitudinal Study of Youth. Image: Wikimedia Commons

A recent study by the National Longitudinal Study of Youth found that nearly half of all young Millennials move back in with their parents. The National Association of Home Builders said the information gathered in the study will help to better understand the implications this demographic has on the housing market.

Also known as Boomerang Millennials, this generation is likely to move out of their parents’ home, return, and then leave again. The data from the study also showed that young Millennials who hold a Bachelor’s degree are also more likely to move back in with their parents than those who don’t hold a degree or are from a lower income household.

According to the study, 90% of individuals born between 1980 and 1984 and who hold a Bachelor’s degree left home before they were 27 years hold. However, half of this group later returned to their parents’ home. Moreover, only 42.1% of those born between 1980 and 1984 and only had a high school diploma returned to their parents’ home.

“Understanding the makeup of those who return home could shed light on the timing of the release of what we know is quite a bit of pent-up demand,” said NAHB Chief Economist David Crowe. “The data may indicate that while this age group is delaying what we think of as typical milestones, the combination of resources and education and what we have found about their preferences suggest growing housing demand in the years ahead.”

Despite the likeliness that Millennials will move back in with their parents, they still hold a strong desire for homeownership and will likely lead to an increase in housing growth in the coming years.

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