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New York adopts emissions limits on concrete

Regulations

New York adopts emissions limits on concrete

EPDs will be required on many state-funded projects by January 2025.


By Peter Fabris, Contributing Editor | October 4, 2023
Image by Anna from Pixabay
Image by Anna from Pixabay

New York State recently adopted emissions limits on concrete used for state-funded public building and transportation projects. It is the first state initiative in the U.S. to enact concrete emissions limits on projects undertaken by all agencies, according to a press release from the governor’s office.

The rule goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2025, and requires that environmental product declarations (EPDs) be submitted for all concrete mixes used on qualifying state-funded projects. The new Buy Clean Concrete guidelines apply to Department of Transportation projects exceeding $3 million and using at least 200 cubic yards of concrete. For other state agencies, the rule applies to projects costing more than $1 million and using more than 50 cubic yards of concrete.

The guidelines include exceptions for emergency projects and those requiring high-strength or quick-cure concrete.

“These actions will send a clear market signal to concrete producers in New York State and the Northeast region to disclose the carbon content of their products and reduce the associated GHG emissions,” said Rebecca Esau, AIA, manager in Rocky Mountain Institute’s Carbon-Free Buildings Program.

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