NCARB survey indicates continued growth of U.S. architects

The number of U.S. architects surpassed 110,000 in 2015, a 2% increase from the previous year.

May 20, 2016 |
NCARB survey indicates continued growth of U.S. architects

Cincinnati's skyline. Photo: Robert S. Donovan/Creative Commons.

There are currently 110,168 architects in the United States, according to the 2015 Survey of Architectural Registration Boards.

This marks the fourth consecutive year of growth and a 2% increase from 2014. Conducted annually by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), the survey, combined with other key indicators, suggests the profession is healthy and growing.

The number of professionals working toward licensure reached an all-time high in 2015, with more than 41,500 candidates either taking the Architect Registration Examination (ARE) and/or reporting experience hours. This data, which will be available in July’s 2016 edition of NCARB by the Numbers, points to a growing interest among the next generation to become an architect.

“While there are a variety of factors that contribute to the health of the profession, these two trends point to a bright future,” said NCARB CEO Michael Armstrong. “As a record number of candidates work toward licensure, NCARB will continue to ensure our programs remain modern and inclusive, yet rigorous.”

The survey also reveals U.S. architects hold 122,579 (out-of-state) licenses, a 3% increase from 2014.

“As the economy improves, architects may be expanding their businesses across state lines,” said Armstrong. “We’ve also seen a growth in the number of architects who hold an NCARB Certificate, which facilitates reciprocal licensure.”

NCARB collects data on resident and reciprocal licenses from its 54 Member Boards, which includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The survey reflects registration data from January to December 2015.

To learn more about the Survey of Architectural Registration Boards, visit www.ncarb.org.

Overlay Init