flexiblefullpage
billboard
interstitial1
catfish1
Currently Reading

Multifamily housing development in Chicago takes design inspiration from patchwork and quilting

Multifamily Housing

Multifamily housing development in Chicago takes design inspiration from patchwork and quilting

Located in the Garfield Park neighborhood, the Brooks + Scarpa-designed structure also takes cues from the city’s centuries-old history of courtyard buildings.


By Novid Parsi, Contributing Editor  | March 7, 2023
Multifamily housing development in Chicago takes design inspiration from patchwork and quilting. All renderings courtesy Brooks + Scarpa
All renderings courtesy Brooks + Scarpa

HUB 32, a 65-unit multifamily housing development, will provide affordable housing and community amenities in Chicago’s Garfield Park neighborhood. 

Brooks + Scarpa’s recently unveiled design takes inspiration from the American tradition of patchwork and quilting. The panels on the building’s exterior create a sense of depth and texture that’s meant to evoke the feeling of a handmade quilt. In addition to providing warmth and comfort, the use of quilting and stitching to inform the design draws on Chicago’s rich textile tradition.

“By incorporating elements of the city’s textile tradition into the design of our building, we hope to create a sense of connection and belonging for our residents,” Brooks + Scarpa says in a statement.

The design of the multifamily housing project also takes cues from the city’s centuries-old history of courtyard buildings. HUB 32 has an elevated courtyard that sits above ground-level commercial space. The courtyard creates usable space at the center of the project, and for the people living around it, the courtyard will provide privacy and safety.

The courtyard also will help the structure fit with its surrounding neighborhood. In addition, the strategic placement of the units and windows will orient the apartments to social spaces that sit apart from each other yet are visually connected to each other and to the street.

Brooks + Scarpa says the building’s design follows its five guiding principles of equity, innovation, a sense of place, environmental stewardship, and community engagement. The design firm says it will partner with local organizations to promote sustainability and support community events and initiatives. “Design excellence … can and should be for everyone,” the firm says in its statement.

On the Building Team:
Owner/developer: KMW Communities and Michaels 
Design architect: Brooks + Scarpa
Architect of record: Studio Dwell
MEP engineer: Quest Design Group
Structural engineer: Rockey Structures

HUB 32 multifamily housing project, chicago, Brooks Scarpa c01

Here is the full design statement from Brooks + Scarpa: 
The design of HUB 32, a 65-unit mid-rise residential building in Chicago is inspired by the concept of quilting and stitching. The inspiration came from American patchwork quilting traditions, exemplified by the Gee's Bend abstract geometric style-which is itself influenced by newspaper- and magazine-collages used for insulation on the inside walls of homes in the early rural American. 

The exterior of the building is adorned with a series of materials and forms that mimic the appearance of a quilt, with each part representing a different pattern or color. These panels are arranged in a way that creates a sense of depth and texture, evoking the feeling of a cozy, handmade quilt.

The idea behind using quilting and stitching as the basis for the design was to create a sense of warmth and comfort, as well as a connection to the rich textile tradition of Chicago. The city has a long history of textile production, and we wanted to pay tribute to that history by incorporating these elements into the design of our building.

Overall, the building is designed to be a welcoming and comfortable place for its residents. Taking cues from the rich history of courtyard buildings in Chicago such as Pattington Apartments, the building is designed around an elevated courtyard above ground level commercial space. The courtyard typology has existed in Chicago for more than two hundred years. It promotes pedestrian-oriented neighborhoods as an alternative to sprawl, creating usable space in the center of the project, instead of unused, leftover space outside of the building volume.

HUB 32 multifamily housing project, chicago, Brooks Scarpa c03

More than any other multi-dwelling housing, courtyard apartments, “make you feel like you belong to a place.” For people living around the courtyard, the space provides a sense of safety and privacy; the courtyard is a quasi-public space that mediates between the home and the street. For the city at large, the courtyard is an urbane housing type that fits well into neighborhoods. Strategically placed windows, purposeful exterior elements and units that wrap the outer-most edges, orient the apartments to social spaces that are spatially apart, yet visually connected to each other and the street below. 

In addition, the design of the building follows our five guiding principals: equity, innovation, a sense of place, environmental stewardship, and community engagement.

Design excellence is not mutually exclusive. It can, and should be for everyone. In terms of equity, we are committed to creating a building that is accessible and welcoming to all members of the community, regardless of their background or circumstances. 

HUB 32 multifamily housing project, chicago, Brooks Scarpa c04

HUB 32 multifamily housing project, chicago, Brooks Scarpa c06

We are also committed to innovation, and are constantly seeking out new ways to improve the design and functionality of our building. This includes incorporating sustainable technologies and materials wherever possible, in order to reduce our environmental impact and provide our residents with a high-quality living experience. We embrace a creative approach to design and problem solving.

A sense of place is important to us, and we want our building to be a reflection of the unique character and history of Garfield Park and the City of Chicago. By incorporating elements of the city's textile tradition into the design of our building, we hope to create a sense of connection and belonging for our residents.

Finally, we are committed to environmental stewardship and community engagement. We believe that it is our responsibility to be good stewards of the environment and to work together with the community to create a better future for everyone. This includes initiatives such as partnering with local organizations to promote sustainability and supporting community events and initiatives.

Hub 32 Chicago section

HUB 32 multifamily housing project, chicago, Brooks Scarpa c05

HUB 32 multifamily housing project, chicago, Brooks Scarpa diagram 3

HUB 32 multifamily housing project, chicago, Brooks Scarpa diagram 1

HUB 32 multifamily housing project, chicago, Brooks Scarpa diagram 2

HUB 32 multifamily housing project, chicago, Brooks Scarpa diagram 422013 FINAL DesignPresentationSubmittal22013 FINAL DesignPresentationSubmittal1.jpg

 

22013 FINAL DesignPresentationSubmittal 3rd.jpg

22013 FINAL DesignPresentationSubmittal 4th.jpg

22013 FINAL DesignPresentationSubmittal 5th.jpg

22013 FINAL DesignPresentationSubmittal 6th .jpg

Related Stories

Student Housing | Jun 20, 2024

How student housing developments are evolving to meet new expectations

The days of uninspired dorm rooms with little more than a bed and a communal bathroom down the hall are long gone. Students increasingly seek inclusive design, communities to enhance learning and living, and a focus on wellness that encompasses everything from meditation spaces to mental health resources.

MFPRO+ News | Jun 20, 2024

National multifamily outlook: Summer 2024

The multifamily sector continues to be strong in 2024, even when a handful of challenges are present. That is according to the Matrix Multifamily National Report for Summer 2024.

Multifamily Housing | Jun 17, 2024

Elevating multifamily properties through quiet luxury

As the demands of urban living continue to evolve, the need for a tranquil and refined home environment has never been more pronounced.

Multifamily Housing | Jun 14, 2024

AEC inspections are the key to financially viable office to residential adaptive reuse projects

About a year ago our industry was abuzz with an idea that seemed like a one-shot miracle cure for both the shockingly high rate of office vacancies and the worsening housing shortage. The seemingly simple idea of converting empty office buildings to multifamily residential seemed like an easy and elegant solution. However, in the intervening months we’ve seen only a handful of these conversions, despite near universal enthusiasm for the concept. 

Adaptive Reuse | Jun 13, 2024

4 ways to transform old buildings into modern assets

As cities grow, their office inventories remain largely stagnant. Yet despite changes to the market—including the impact of hybrid work—opportunities still exist. Enter: “Midlife Metamorphosis.”

Affordable Housing | Jun 12, 2024

Studio Libeskind designs 190 affordable housing apartments for seniors

In Brooklyn, New York, the recently opened Atrium at Sumner offers 132,418 sf of affordable housing for seniors. The $132 million project includes 190 apartments—132 of them available to senior households earning below or at 50% of the area median income and 57 units available to formerly homeless seniors. 

MFPRO+ News | Jun 11, 2024

Rents rise in multifamily housing for May 2024

Multifamily rents rose for the fourth month in a row, according to the May 2024 National Multifamily Report. Up 0.6% year-over-year, the average U.S. asking rent increased by $6 in May, up to $1,733.

Apartments | Jun 4, 2024

Apartment sizes on the rise after decade-long shrinking trend

The average size of new apartments in the U.S. saw substantial growth in 2023, bouncing back to 916 sf after a steep decline the previous year. That is according to a recent RentCafe market insight report released this month.

Multifamily Housing | Jun 3, 2024

Grassroots groups becoming a force in housing advocacy

A growing movement of grassroots organizing to support new housing construction is having an impact in city halls across the country. Fed up with high housing costs and the commonly hostile reception to new housing proposals, advocacy groups have sprung up in many communities to attend public meetings to speak in support of developments.

MFPRO+ News | Jun 3, 2024

New York’s office to residential conversion program draws interest from 64 owners

New York City’s Office Conversion Accelerator Program has been contacted by the owners of 64 commercial buildings interested in converting their properties to residential use.

boombox1
boombox2
native1

More In Category




Multifamily Housing

AEC inspections are the key to financially viable office to residential adaptive reuse projects

About a year ago our industry was abuzz with an idea that seemed like a one-shot miracle cure for both the shockingly high rate of office vacancies and the worsening housing shortage. The seemingly simple idea of converting empty office buildings to multifamily residential seemed like an easy and elegant solution. However, in the intervening months we’ve seen only a handful of these conversions, despite near universal enthusiasm for the concept. 

halfpage1

Most Popular Content

  1. 2021 Giants 400 Report
  2. Top 150 Architecture Firms for 2019
  3. 13 projects that represent the future of affordable housing
  4. Sagrada Familia completion date pushed back due to coronavirus
  5. Top 160 Architecture Firms 2021