Currently Reading

It's official: Norman Foster-designed Harmon hotel and casino to be razed due to structural issues

It's official: Norman Foster-designed Harmon hotel and casino to be razed due to structural issues

Construction of the Las Vegas tower was halted in 2008 after experts discovered faulty steel beams in the structure. Now its owner, MGM, has received permission to demolish the building. 


By BD+C Staff | May 9, 2014
Photo: Vrysxy via Wikimedia Common
Photo: Vrysxy via Wikimedia Common

The long and controversial tale of the Harmon hotel and casino is over: MGM Resorts International has received permission to demolish the tower, Dezeen reports.

The court ruling comes in the midst of the debate between owner MGM and developer Tutor Perini, which has been waged over who is at fault for the building's failure.

Construction of the resort was halted after experts discovered faulty steel beams in the structure. They determined that the beams would not stand up to an earthquake.

Elizabeth Gonzalez, a Clark County District judge, has ordered lawyers on either side to collect outstanding evidence, in effect paving the way for demolition. The demolition will involve the complex being taken apart floor by floor, at a cost of $11.5 million.

Foster + Partners designed the Harmon, which broke ground in 2006. The structural issues were discovered two years into construction.

Some history on the project via Wikipedia:

In late 2008, work on the Harmon Hotel/Condo Tower was stopped after inspectors discovered construction defects: county inspectors discovered improper installation by Pacific Coast Steel, of critical steel reinforcements (rebar) after 15 stories of the building had already been erected.

The error caused a major change in the building's design; instead of being 49 stories, it was reduced to 28 stories with the condominium element, The Harmon Residences removed entirely. At the time, 88 of the 207 condominiums were reserved by buyers who had put 20 percent down. Those buyers were offered refunds or the option to buy in other buildings. 

Related Stories

Multifamily Housing | Sep 22, 2021

11 notable multifamily projects to debut in 2021

A residence for older LGBTQ+ persons, a P3 student housing building, and a converted masonic lodge highlight the multifamily developments to debut this year. 

Data Centers | Sep 22, 2021

Wasted energy from data centers could power nearby buildings

A Canadian architecture firm comes up with a concept for a community that’s part of a direct-current microgrid.

Hotel Facilities | Sep 22, 2021

Will hotel developers finally embrace modular construction?

Last May, MiTek, a construction software and building services company that’s part of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway conglomerate, formed a partnership with Danny Forster & Architecture to promote modular design and construction.

Arena | Sep 20, 2021

LA Clippers unveil $1.8 billion Intuit Dome

AECOM is the lead designer for the project.

University Buildings | Sep 7, 2021

Gateway to the West: Kansas City University Center for Medical Education Innovation

Kansas City University Center for Medical Education Innovation uses GKD Omega 1520 metal fabric.

Architects | Sep 2, 2021

Remembering architect and author Lance Hosey: 1964 - 2021

Architect, sustainability expert, author, and public speaker Lance Hosey passed away unexpectedly on August 27.

Multifamily Housing | Sep 1, 2021

Top 10 outdoor amenities at multifamily housing developments for 2021

Fire pits, lounge areas, and covered parking are the most common outdoor amenities at multifamily housing developments, according to new research from Multifamily Design+Construction.

Architects | Sep 1, 2021

Design unveiled for Copia Vineyards Winery and Tasting Room

Clayton Korte designed the project.

Giants 400 | Aug 30, 2021

2021 Giants 400 Report: Ranking the largest architecture, engineering, and construction firms in the U.S.

The 2021 Giants 400 Report includes more than 130 rankings across 25 building sectors and specialty categories.

Laboratories | Aug 30, 2021

Science in the sky: Designing high-rise research labs

Recognizing the inherent socioeconomic and environmental benefits of high-density design, research corporations have boldly embraced high-rise research labs. 

More In Category





Magazine Subscription
Subscribe

Get our Newsletters

Each day, our editors assemble the latest breaking industry news, hottest trends, and most relevant research, delivered to your inbox.

Subscribe

Follow BD+C: