flexiblefullpage -
billboard - default
interstitial1 - interstitial
Currently Reading

Istanbul opens biggest base-isolated hospital in the world

Healthcare Facilities

Istanbul opens biggest base-isolated hospital in the world

Cloud computing allowed complicated design to be completed in less than a year.


By John Caulfield, Senior Editor | June 10, 2020

The 1-million-sm Basaksehir Cam and Sakura Hospital in Istanbul is designed to withstand a seismic event that might happen only every 2,500 years. Images: Ronesons Holding

The largest base-isolated building in the world officially opened in earthquake-prone Istanbul, Turkey, on May 21.

The 1-million-sm, $1.5 billion Basaksehir Cam and Sakura City Hospital, located near the North Anatolian fault of the Europe side of this city, features 2,068 seismic isolators. It is designed—by Perkins and Will’s Washington D.C. office, in collaboration with the Turkish firm Yazgan Design Architecture—to meet ASCE 41 “Immediate Occupancy” seismic performance objective under a rare earthquake event.

“From a structural standpoint, the criterion is designing the building to meet an event that might happen every 2,500 years,” says Aysegul Gogus, a project manager for Arup’s Los Angeles office. Arup, the structural engineer on this project, worked with two investment firms, Rönesans Holding and Japan-based Sojitz Corporation, to execute this hospital under a P3 arrangement that included Turkey’s Ministry of Health. Turkey’s president Recap Tayyip Erdogan, and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, participated in the grand opening.

(“Cam” means “pine” in Turkish, and “sakura” means “cherry blossoms” in Japanese.)

Also see: Prescient receives ICC Certification for seismic resilience system

One of the 2,068 seismic isolators that, in tandem, could reduce the seismic force on the hospital's superstructure by a factor of three.

 

CLOUD COMPUTING WAS CRITICAL TO TESTING

In an interview with BD+C yesterday, Gogus explained that the seismic design for a building this large required far more complicated analytical modeling than would normally be the case. These models typically have longer computer running times and, possibly, convergence issues.

Consequently, cloud computing—which allowed Arup to run several analyses simultaneously—was essential to moving this project forward expeditiously. “The software we used for ground-motion analysis allowed for a lot of automation,” so the models could be created quicker, she said. The building’s design was completed in less than a year.

Arup chose to go with triple-friction pendulum isolators, which exhibit behavior with amplitude-dependent strength and instantaneous stiffness.  These isolators allow the building to move horizontally and help release seismic energy. Gogus stated that the isolators can displace up to 700 millimeters during a seismic event, and, in the opinion of Arup and the developers, would reduce the seismic force on the superstructure by a factor of three.

Also see: A Seismic Advance in Performance

The hospital, with 2,682 beds, has the capacity to handle up to 32,700 patients per day.

 

ARUP HONES ITS AUTOMATION SKILLS

Gogus admits that seismic building codes aren’t always where Arup would like them to be, which is why the firm studied six different isolation schemes using nonlinear time history analysese at the onset of the project. Arup was also able to visualize its analyses for presentations to the project’s stakeholders.

This project, said Gogus, “really helped us improve our automation skills.”

The hospital has 2,682 beds that include around 400 ICU beds. There are three hospital towers, six clinical buildings, five auxiliary facility buildings, 90 operating theaters, and 4,300 medical personnel. The hospital has the capacity to handle 32,700 patients per day. About one-fifth of the hospital’s total footprint—211,000 sm—is landscaped.

Related Stories

Sponsored | Healthcare Facilities | May 3, 2022

Planning for hospital campus access that works for people

This course defines the elements of hospital campus access that are essential to promoting the efficient, stress-free movement of patients, staff, family, and visitors. Campus access elements include signage and wayfinding, parking facilities, transportation demand management, shuttle buses, curb access, valet parking management, roadways, and pedestrian walkways.

Healthcare Facilities | Apr 19, 2022

6 trends to watch in healthcare design

As the healthcare landscape continues to evolve, IMEG’s healthcare leaders from across the country are seeing several emerging trends that are poised to have wide-ranging impacts on facility design and construction. Following are six of the trends and strategies they expect to become more commonplace in 2022 and the years to come. 

Healthcare Facilities | Apr 14, 2022

Healthcare construction veteran creates next-level IPD process for hospital projects

Can integrated project delivery work without incentives for building team members? Denton Wilson thinks so.

Market Data | Apr 14, 2022

FMI 2022 construction spending forecast: 7% growth despite economic turmoil

Growth will be offset by inflation, supply chain snarls, a shortage of workers, project delays, and economic turmoil caused by international events such as the Russia-Ukraine war.

Laboratories | Apr 7, 2022

North Carolina's latest play for biotech real estate development

The Tar Heel State is among a growing number of markets rolling out the welcome mat for lab spaces.

Healthcare Facilities | Apr 7, 2022

Visibility breeds traffic in healthcare design

Ryan Companies has completed several healthcare projects that gain exposure by being near retail stores or office buildings.

Healthcare Facilities | Mar 25, 2022

Health group converts bank building to drive-thru clinic

Edward-Elmhurst Health and JTS Architects had to get creative when turning an American Chartered Bank into a drive-thru clinic for outpatient testing and vaccinations.

Projects | Mar 21, 2022

BIG-designed Danish Neuroscience Center will combine groundbreaking science and treatment

A first-of-its-kind facility, a new Danish Neuroscience Center in Aarhus, Denmark designed by BIG, will combine psychiatry and neuroscience under one roof. 

Projects | Mar 18, 2022

Toronto suburb to build the largest hospital in Canada

A new hospital in Ontario will nearly triple the care capacity of its existing facility—becoming the largest hospital in Canada. 

Projects | Mar 15, 2022

Old Sears store will become one of the largest orthopaedics outpatient facilities in the Northeast

A former Sears store in Rochester, N.Y., will be transformed into one of the largest orthopaedics outpatient facilities in the Northeast.

boombox1 - default
boombox2 -
native1 -

More In Category

Healthcare Facilities

Planning for hospital campus access that works for people

This course defines the elements of hospital campus access that are essential to promoting the efficient, stress-free movement of patients, staff, family, and visitors. Campus access elements include signage and wayfinding, parking facilities, transportation demand management, shuttle buses, curb access, valet parking management, roadways, and pedestrian walkways.



Healthcare Facilities

6 trends to watch in healthcare design

As the healthcare landscape continues to evolve, IMEG’s healthcare leaders from across the country are seeing several emerging trends that are poised to have wide-ranging impacts on facility design and construction. Following are six of the trends and strategies they expect to become more commonplace in 2022 and the years to come. 


halfpage1 -

Most Popular Content

  1. 2021 Giants 400 Report
  2. Top 150 Architecture Firms for 2019
  3. 13 projects that represent the future of affordable housing
  4. Sagrada Familia completion date pushed back due to coronavirus
  5. Top 160 Architecture Firms 2021

 


Magazine Subscription
Subscribe

Get our Newsletters

Each day, our editors assemble the latest breaking industry news, hottest trends, and most relevant research, delivered to your inbox.

Subscribe

Follow BD+C: