From an industrial park to an eco-neighborhood in Brussels, Belgium

At the heart of Vincent Callebaut Architectures’ eco-neighborhood will be three 100-meter-tall Vertical Forests.

January 24, 2017 |

Rendering courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures

A former industrial park constructed in 1907 and originally used as a shipping and customs complex is set to undergo a transformation into a sustainable eco-neighborhood covering 135,000-sm.

A little less than one-third of this space consists of the 40,000-sm Gare Maritime (Marine Terminal). The eco-neighborhood’s masterplan calls for this building to be redeveloped into an eco-campus for work and relaxation, according to Arch Daily. The Gare Maritime’s architecture is representative of the industrial era in which it was created; an aesthetic that will be maintained throughout the redevelopment.

The structure comprises five parallel cast iron and glass “vessels” that, under the new development, will each host their own architectural identities. However, the contemporary interventions that will be added to the structure’s five spaces will all be detached from the original building, creating a contrast with the industrial wrought iron of the existing structure and the solid wood and cross-laminated timber of the additions.

The five spaces within the Gare Maritime will combine to create a mixed-use campus with offices, sports and leisure spaces, retail, bars, restaurants, and greenhouses. A public park and canal will also be brought inside the terminal.

The Gare Maritime isn’t most striking component of Vincent Callebaut Architectures’ design, however. Just to the north of the Gare Maritime are three vertical forests, containing a total of 85,000 sm of multiple-scale housing. The vertical forests have a slope reminiscent of a ski jump, varying between 24 and 100 meters in height. These Vertical Forests are covered with trees and gardens from top to bottom. Each building will have a large roof containing fruit and vegetable balconies and solar panels.

The Vertical Forests and the Gare Maritame will be connected by a large marsh pond, a bar and restaurant created from a former fish and oil covered market, and what the architects are calling a giant lilypad, which exists within the marsh pond and provides space for events, exhibits, and an open-air auditorium.

In total, 85,000 sm will be used for housing with the remaining 50,000 sm used for office, retail, and leisure.

 

Rendering courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures.

 

Rendering courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures.

 

Rendering courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures.

 

Rendering courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures.

 

Rendering courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures.

 

Rendering courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures.

 

Rendering courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures.

 

Rendering courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures.

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