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Energy modeling payback typically as short as one to two months

Energy

Energy modeling payback typically as short as one to two months

Energy modeling is a ‘no-brainer—like checking MPG on a car’


By Peter Fabris, Contributing Editor | June 7, 2016

Photo: Phillip Pessar/Creative Commons.

Energy modeling that includes calculating the operational energy savings that accrue after an initial capital investment, has a quick payback—typically one-to-two months, according to Anica Landreneau, director of sustainability consulting with architecture and engineering firm HOK.

With the rule of thumb of a three year or shorter payback to make energy conservation measures cost-effective, modeling is a “no-brainer,” Landreneau told attendees at the Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Summit in Washington, D.C.

For large buildings, modeling costs run from $30,000 to $200,000 depending on the energy conservation measures considered and the tools used to evaluate them. Even the high side of that range is a fraction of the annual energy costs of a typical large building.

Landreneau said modeling is a key tool in maintaining the HOK’s global standing as a high-performance leader. HOK also sees modeling as a mechanism for shifting investment from a building’s active, mechanical systems to its passive, architectural elements.

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