California imposes stringent new water standards

California is the first state to adopt standards that are more efficient than those set by EPA's WaterSense program. 

April 12, 2015 |
California imposes stringent new water standards

An aerial view of the California Aqueduct at the Interstate 205 crossing west of Tracy. Photo: Ikluft via Wikimedia Commons

The California Energy Commission (CEC) recently took measures aimed at saving the drought-stricken state billions of gallons of water.

The CEC approved new standards on toilets, urinals, and faucets that are sold in California. The new standards will be the most water-efficient in the country. Once the current stock of products is turned over, the CEC says the measure will save more than 100 billion gallons of water annually.

California is the first state to adopt standards that are more efficient than those set by EPA's WaterSense program. Next year, all urinals sold in California will use only 1 pint of water or less for each flush (the old standard was 1.0 gallons per flush, WaterSense is 0.5 gpf) and bathroom faucets will use no more than 1.2 gallons of water per minute (the old standard was 2.2 gpm, WaterSense is 1.5 gpm).

These standards go into effect on Jan. 1, 2016. The new standards do not require homes and businesses to replace plumbing fixtures. The CEC is working on a rebate program to make the purchase of more efficient appliances more affordable.

Overlay Init