Six questions to ask before purchasing a door

A set of six questions to help you confidently purchase the right door.

Sponsored content
May 18, 2015 |
Bray Allen
Six Questions to Ask Before Purchasing a Door

Things to consider before purchasing include wind speed requirements and need for door to be rated for fire.

The wrong door creates problems for everyone: customers suffer delays, contractors have to scramble for a solution, and suppliers are caught in the middle. As proud as we are of our own sheet door product line, we know sometimes our doors are not the right fit for a job. Often, the right question at the outset would have saved everyone needless headaches. Below is a set of six questions to help you confidently purchase the right door.

1. Is the door the correct size?

This seems almost too obvious, but doors that are too large or too small for a given building often find their way to the job site. Make sure to check not just the door itself, but all its operating components. This is especially important for retrofit projects which may need to account for existing guides.

2. Does the door address wind speed requirements?

Different regions require doors that are certified for different wind loads, especially in coastal areas where winds can reach exceptionally high speeds.

3. Does the door need to be rated for fire?

In addition to certification, a fire rated door usually requires the installation of additional specialty components. Make sure you know everything needed to achieve the desired final product.

4. Does the door achieve energy needs?

Energy codes differ from state to state. Code modifications and a complicated interaction within the building envelope can make door selection especially challenging. An expert may be needed to calculate energy efficiency.

For all questions, continue reading on the Star Buildings Insight Warehouse blog.

Bray Allen | Metal Building Trends
DBCI
R&D Manager and Sales Manager

Bray Allen is R&D manager and sales manager at DBCI, a leading manufacturer of rolling sheet doors. During ten years with DBCI, Allen has directed hundreds of projects, including a revitalization effort of DBCI’s wind-rated series and the development of the new Curl-Lok door. With over 20 years of field experience, he is also the second vice chair of DASMA’s rolling door division and chairman of the rolling sheet door subcommittee.

Related Blogs

June 20, 2017 | Building Team | Metal Building Trends

Getting a project through plan review can be an unusually long process, anywhere from six months to two yea...

May 22, 2017 | Metals | Metal Building Trends

In many metal building applications, straight columns may have more steel than they need.

May 08, 2017 | Building Team | Metal Building Trends

The most important factor in making sure the where, when, what, and how go smoothly is making sure you pick...

May 03, 2017 | Metals | Metal Building Trends

There are robust, well-proven ways to protect steel so it can perform up to its potential virtually indefin...

January 31, 2017 | Metal Building Trends

GF Construction, led by Charles and Jerry Fombrun, designed an industrial manufacturing development in Hait...

December 13, 2016 | Moisture Control/Building Envelope | Metal Building Trends

The basic idea of a rainscreen is to have an exterior surface – a cladding layer - that breaks the force of...

December 01, 2016 | Metals | Metal Building Trends

Today’s codes define more efficient, effective structures, but the engineering of them has become vastly mo...

November 21, 2016 | Metals | Metal Building Trends

There is a mistaken belief among some people that steel buildings do not do well in earthquakes. The truth...

Overlay Init