Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 – designed with the AEC industry in mind

Sasha Reed sits down with Microsoft’s Senior Director of Programs, Pete Kyriacou to discuss the unique challenges AEC professionals face and why the  Surface Pro 3 was designed to help them be more productive.

Sponsored content
October 07, 2015 |
Sasha Reed
Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 – designed with the AEC industry in mind

Microsoft explains how they made the impossible, possible in building the Surface Pro 3 with Bluebeam Revu in their keynote presentation here: http://bit.ly/1gmWkEy

Does the Surface Pro 3 really meet the needs of the AEC industry? I caught up with Pete Kyriacou, Microsoft’s Senior Director of Programs, at the Bluebeam eXtreme Conference in Los Angeles to talk about the tablet and whether it really measures up in meeting the mobility needs of the industry. Kyriacou is a former AEC professional who is in charge of working with Microsoft’s engineers to take products from prototype to mass production. He and the Microsoft Surface team were at the conference to announce a joint effort between Microsoft and Bluebeam to improve mobility workflows for designers and builders from the office to the field. See the full interview here.

In the keynote address, Kyriacou talked through the design of the Surface Pro 3, explaining the natural fit for Microsoft and Bluebeam as technology integrators. Working closely with Microsoft, Bluebeam was able to take advantage of the power of the Surface Pro 3 device to create a more intuitive end-user experience with Revu. When I sat down with Kyriacou, I asked him to expound on this integration to better understand the fit for the AEC industry. 

“We’re super excited about people using our devices to be more productive,” he said. Noting the specific challenges facing technical professionals, he continued, “We got really excited because of the precision that’s needed for a lot of the drawings and document control—the processing power that’s required for a lot of the modeling, as well as the drawings, and the requirement on mobility, being able to be in the field with all that power—all that processing really fit well with the Surface device.” 

If Kyriacou seems passionate about the usability of the Surface Pro 3 for the AEC industry, it’s because he has firsthand experience with the workflows. Back before he was designing consumer products, he was a Program Manager for a few large building projects in the Los Angeles area. Converting warehouses into Charter schools for GreenDot, Kyriacou says he gained a true appreciation for what AEC professionals go through to get a project off the ground. Relating this experience of designing hardware within oftentimes impossible parameters, Microsoft pushed their engineers to do the impossible and take risks.

How did Microsoft come to connect with Bluebeam? An architectural customer in Manhattan told them they used Revu and loved it. This increased the team’s interest, and the two companies began talking. Kyriacou recalled how early on in the discussions, an internal catch phrase was uncovered– “getting stuff done”—that turned into the unofficial mantra shared by both companies. 

The newly optimized Revu on the Surface Pro 3 shines when marking up a drawing.  According to Kyriacou, “The Pen on the Pro 3 is really unique. It’s an active stylus. That means you get high precision. It’s not an extension of a finger: it truly is an inking device. Bluebeam’s done a great job of doing auto-detect; it disambiguates between ink and fingers.  So, fingers can be used for pinch and zoom, navigating a screen while the Pen’s used for actually taking notes, writing on the screen.”

Having spent a lot of time talking with industry professionals about their mobility needs, I was curious to hear from my peers just how the Surface Pro 3 measured up.  I wasn’t surprised to hear overwhelmingly positive feedback, with many saying that it’s even replacing their laptop.  The benefit of having only one operating system to support in the office and in the field outweighs the lack of LTE 4G support,  with most teams working around that by leveraging hot spots or applications with online-offline capabilities.  The portability and the power of the Surface are a winning combination for both end user and IT. 

Speaking to Kyriacou, it was interesting to hear how his engineers faced challenges similar to AEC project teams. With growing constraints, he pushed them to take risks, to push the bounds of what is possible. It appears this risk has paid off, as the Surface Pro 3 just might be the mobile solution AEC professionals have been waiting for. 

Sasha Reed | StrXur by Bluebeam
Bluebeam, Inc.
Vice President of Strategic Development

As Vice President of Strategic Development at Bluebeam, Inc., Sasha Reed collaborates with leaders in the architecture, engineering and construction industry to guide Bluebeam’s technology, partnerships and long-term goals. She joined Bluebeam in 2007 and co-created the Concierge Approach, a distinctly branded process of customer engagement, product feedback and solution delivery to which much of Bluebeam’s success is attributed, and which today is replicated at every organizational level.

Sasha is known industry-wide as a “conversation facilitator,” creating platforms for exchanges necessary to digitally advance the industry, including the BD+C Magazine Digital COM Blog, which she authors and manages. She’s been a featured presenter at numerous national and international conferences, including the 2014 Design-Build Institute of America (DBIA), Federal Project Delivery Symposium and NTI Danish BIM Conference. Sasha also co-chairs the Construction PDF Coalition, a grassroots effort to provide a common industry framework from which to create and maintain construction PDF documents, serves on the City College of San Francisco BIM Industry Council, and is Advisor to the Board of Direction for the National Institute of Building Sciences BuildingSMART Alliance.

Related Blogs

December 15, 2017 | StrXur by Bluebeam

Looking beyond today’s constraints to the possibility of what “could be” is a key characteristic of those d...

November 30, 2017 | BIM and Information Technology | StrXur by Bluebeam

New York’s Tappan Zee Bridge first opened to traffic in 1955.

4 people speaking on a panel
September 19, 2017 | BIM and Information Technology | StrXur by Bluebeam

In this four-part series, Bluebeam VP Sasha Reed sat down with industry experts to examine the need for def...

A hospital under construction
August 28, 2017 | Healthcare Facilities | StrXur by Bluebeam

McCarthy will continue to lean on Bluebeam solutions to help solve the most critical issues, and to keep th...

An exterior shot of the Beijing National Stadium
August 17, 2017 | Building Materials | StrXur by Bluebeam

Lighter than glass and 100% recyclable, one material takes center stage in the future of building.

Rendering of a Matrix-style theater
August 02, 2017 | Architects | StrXur by Bluebeam

An Australian Home Theater Company is out to prove that the easier you can see it, the easier you can sell...

July 19, 2017 | Architects | StrXur by Bluebeam

Our goal is to present unique perspectives you may not be able to find anywhere else.  

July 13, 2017 | Accelerate Live! | StrXur by Bluebeam

From my perspective, what separates organizations thriving in the digital revolution from those who are not...

March 15, 2017 | StrXur by Bluebeam

Who is succeeding, and on what terms? And what will it take for everyone to experience the benefits of that...

October 04, 2016 | Building Team | StrXur by Bluebeam

As the construction industry bounces back from the Great Recession, an entirely new class of tech-savvy con...

Overlay Init