A behind-the-scenes look at the Museum of the Moving Image facade

In 2008, Leeser Architecture of New York and F.J. Sciame Construction Company oversaw the three-year, $67 million expansion project to create more space for the museum’s impressive exhibit collection.

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November 25, 2019 |

The Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, Queens, N.Y., is a one-of-a-kind destination celebrating the art, history, technique and technology of film, television and digital media that delights visitors from across the world.  The museum undertook a significant renovation project with performance goals that were anything but a moving target.

In 2008, Leeser Architecture of New York and F.J. Sciame Construction Company oversaw the three-year, $67 million expansion project to create more space for the museum’s impressive exhibit collection. The distinguished three-story addition was completed in 2011, successfully doubling the museum’s size from 50,000 to 97,700 square feet. As was only fitting for a museum honoring the silver screen, the construction achieved the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design® (LEED®) silver standard performance certification.

To reach these performance goals, the design and build team carefully specified solutions that would deliver an optimal and safe environment for the museum’s exhibits and guests. The robust Thermafiber® RainBarrier® 45 mineral wool was specified in the open joint exterior façade application to deliver the energy saving continuous insulation (ci), exceptional thermal and moisture resistance and critical fire safety characteristics. Made with a minimum of 70 percent recycled content, the installation of RainBarrier® 45 also contributed towards 13 LEED® credit categories that supported the Silver LEED certification goal.

 

Exterior Façade

MG Mcgrath Inc., a specialty sheet metal contractor, fabricated and installed the custom 15,000-square foot exterior rainscreen panel system that became a signature design element for the Museum. This rear façade was clad with 1,067 light-blue aluminum plate triangle wall panels in a pattern that created a dramatic floating illusion. These triangles were adhered with precision to an open joint support structure that allows for rain drainage and air pressure equalization

Owens Corning experts consulted directly with MG Mcgrath on the installation of RainBarrier® 45 into this building enclosure to help efficiently drain water so the building could dry without sacrificing the energy-saving R-value of 4.3 per inch. This was a critical step to help manage interior thermal temperature and maintain optimal humidity conditions for the exhibits that count a Chewbacca mask from the Star Wars films and original Kermit the Frog and Miss Piggy puppets among the beloved items.

In addition to delivering a continuous thermal barrier, RainBarrier®45 mineral wool is non-combustible and has well-documented fire resistant properties for providing protection to the exterior façade while not burning or releasing toxic smoke or gasses in the event of a fire.  

Together, the exceptional thermal, moisture and fire performance of RainBarrier® 45 supported the architectural design vision and will help preserve the priceless museum collection for future generations to enjoy. For more information on the Owens Corning® Thermafiber® mineral wool insulation solutions, visit www.owenscorning.com/thermafiber.

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