AIA names its 2013 COTE Top Ten Green Projects

April 22, 2013

7. Pearl Brewery/Full Goods Warehouse; San Antonio
Lake Flato Architects

All Photos: Courtesy Lake Flato Architects

This 67,000 square foot LEED Gold warehouse includes passive solutions including open breezeways, which were carefully oriented to prevailing summer breezes and supplemented with large ceiling fans. Large light monitors oriented to the north provide natural daylight to the breezeways, while the south wall of the cupola is open to allow hot air to escape as it rises. 100% of the rainwater captured from roofs coupled with recycled water, is used to irrigate the landscaping on site, eliminating the need for potable irrigation water. Highly efficient ductless minisplit systems were installed to condition indoor spaces. These systems can serve multiple zones using only one outdoor unit, and allows individual control of the air conditioning in each room. Read more about the Pearl Brewery/Full Goods Warehouse (via AIA)

 

 

8. San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Headquarters (SFPUC); San Francisco
Joint Venture: KMD Architects w/ Stevens & Associates

Photo: ©2012 Bruce Damonte

The building is designed to achieve LEED Platinum certification and will exceed California’s recently-instituted Title 24 requirements for energy efficiency in new office buildings by 55% according to SFPUC estimates. The building will produce up to 7% of its own power needs from renewable photovoltaic and wind sources; will provide $118 million in energy cost savings over 75 years; and will require 45% less energy to illuminate the interior through daylight-harvesting and advanced lighting design, compared to typical Class A office buildings. The SFPUC consumes 60% less water than similarly sized buildings and is one of the first buildings in the nation with on-site treatment of gray and black water. Read more about the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Headquarters (via AIA)

Photo: ©2012 Bruce Damonte

Photo: ©2012 Bruce Damonte

Photo: ©2012 Bruce Damonte

Photo: ©2012 Bruce Damonte

Photo: ©2012 Bruce Damonte

 

 

9. Swenson Civil Engineering Building; Duluth, Minnesota
Design Architect: Ross Barney Architects
Architect of Record: SJA Architects

Photo: Kate Joyce Studios

As an educational facility whose curriculum directly impacts the natural environment, the building overtly exposes sustainable systems and materials. 73% of the site is devoted to pervious materials and landscaping, reducing site detention requirements. An extensive green roof with native plants covers 22% of the roof, reducing storm water rates and filtering impurities. Storm water is directed from the roof to three scuppers and into above ground cylinders filled with rocks for filtering. Storm water eventually makes its way to a French drain system of underground water storage pipes for retention. The site lighting is minimal, and all fixtures are equipped with full cut-off optics. Read more about the Swenson Civil Engineering Building (via AIA)

Photo: Kate Joyce Studios

Photo: Kate Joyce Studios

Photo: Kate Joyce Studios

Photo: Kate Joyce Studios

Photo: Kate Joyce Studios

Photo: Kate Joyce Studios

Photo: Kate Joyce Studios

 

 

10. Yin Yang House; Venice, California
Brooks + Scarpa

Photo: John Edward Linden

This sound passive design strategy combined with a very tight perimeter building envelope and other active sustainable features such as the 12kw solar system make this home a zero energy consumption home. It produces 100% of its energy needs and since completion, has never received an electric bill. The design maximizes the opportunities of the mild, marine climate with a passive cooling strategy using cross-ventilation and a thermal chimney. A large cantilevered roof overhang shades all the bedrooms from direct sunlight while providing ample natural light and ventilation. The project also has green roofs, its own storm water retention system and retains 95% of roof storm water on site. Read more about the Yin Yang House (via AIA)

Photos: John Edward Linden

Photo: John Edward Linden

Photo: John Edward Linden

Photos: John Edward Linden

Photos: John Edward Linden

 

More on the 2013 AIA COTE Top Ten Green Projects winners.

 

About The American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1857, members of the American Institute of Architects consistently work to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public well being.  Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders, and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit www.aia.org.

         
 

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