AIA names its 2013 COTE Top Ten Green Projects

Charles David Keeling Apartments, La Jolla, Calif., by KieranTimberlake. Photo:
Charles David Keeling Apartments, La Jolla, Calif., by KieranTimberlake. Photo: Tim Griffith
April 22, 2013

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) and its Committee on the Environment (COTE) have selected the top ten examples of sustainable architecture and green design solutions that protect and enhance the environment. The projects will be honored at the AIA 2013 National Convention and Design Exposition in Denver.

The COTE Top Ten Green Projects program, now in its 17th year, is the profession's best known recognition program for sustainable design excellence. The program celebrates projects that are the result of a thoroughly integrated approach to architecture, natural systems and technology. They make a positive contribution to their communities, improve comfort for building occupants and reduce environmental impacts through strategies such as reuse of existing structures, connection to transit systems, low-impact and regenerative site development, energy and water conservation, use of sustainable or renewable construction materials, and design that improves indoor air quality.

The 2013 COTE Top Ten Green Projects jury includes: Fiona Cousins, PE, Arup; Lance Hosey, AIA, RTKL; Keelan Kaiser, AIA, Judson University; Sheila Kennedy, AIA, Kennedy & Violich Architecture Ltd.; Rod Kruse, FAIA, BNIM Architects and Gail Vittori, Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems.

 

 

1. Charles David Keeling Apartments; La Jolla, California
KieranTimberlake

Photo: Tim Griffith

The design response was to tune the design to capitalize on the favorable environmental features, while moderating or eliminating the undesirable ones. This led to a building envelope that uses thermal mass to buffer temperature changes, minimizes solar gain, and naturally ventilates. Water scarcity is managed through a comprehensive strategy of conservation and reuse, including on-site wastewater recycling. A vegetated roof, an unusual feature in this dry climate, absorbs and evaporates rain that falls on that portion of the building, with overflow directed to the courtyard retention basins. Read more about the Charles David Keeling Apartments (via AIA)

Photo: Tim Griffith

Photo: Tim Griffith

Photo: Tim Griffith

Photo: Tim Griffith

Photo: Tim Griffith

 

 

2. Clock Shadow Building; Milwaukee
Continuum Architects + Planners

Photo: Daniel Andera Photography

This project cleans up a brown-field site that was difficult to develop. The continental climate provides large swings in temperature and humidity which necessitated passive strategies such as: southern facing windows with sun screens that maximize insolation of the sun during cooler months and operable windows that let cool fresh air into the building, allowing the users to effectively “turn off” the heating and cooling systems during swing months. To gain the most efficiency from the HVAC systems, the project utilizes a geo-thermal system, drilled directly below the building, which stabilizes the temperature of the conditioned water used to heat and cool the spaces. Read more about the Clock Shadow Building (via AIA)

Photo: Daniel Andera Photography

Photo: Daniel Andera Photography

Photo: Daniel Andera Photography

Illustration: Continuum Architects + Planners

Photo: Daniel Andera Photography

Photo: Daniel Andera Photography

 

 

3. Federal Center South Building 1202; Seattle
ZGF Architects LLP

Photo: Benjamin Benschneider

Current energy models predict the building to operate at a “net zero capable” Energy Use Intensity (EUI) of 20.3 kBtu/SF/year, performing 40 percent better than ASHRAE 2007. The building will earn an ENERGY STAR Score of 100 and comply with 2030 Challenge goals. The project is one of the first in the region to use structural piles for geothermal heating and cooling, as well as a phase change thermal storage tank. Two new products, chilled sails and open office lighting, were developed and manufactured specifically for this project to help achieve aggressive energy targets. To optimize the use of the available reclaimed timbers, the team designed, tested, and constructed the first wood composite beam system in the U.S. Read more about the Federal Center South Building 1202 (via AIA)

Photo: Benjamin Benschneider

Photo: Benjamin Benschneider

Photo: Benjamin Benschneider

Photo: Benjamin Benschneider

Photo: Benjamin Benschneider

Photo: Benjamin Benschneider

Illustration: ZGF Architects LLP

 

         
 

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