Top 10 Buildings: Women in Architecture

April 05, 2011

Making my selection of buildings this week led me to a surprising discovery about the representation of women in architecture, writes Tom Mallory, COO and co-founder, OpenBuildings.com. I started with a simple enough premise to select 10 buildings by female architects off the top of my head. I was immediately picking out Zaha Hadid, Kazuyo Sejima and Gae Aulenti; I thought this selection would essentially pick itself. Instead, what I discovered was that finding female-created architecture, when excluding husband/wife teams, is extremely difficult and often the only work I came across was more akin to interior design.

Full story

Source: Huffington Post

         
 

Comments on: "Top 10 Buildings: Women in Architecture"

Comments

Women In Architecture

I have a daughter who has her own business from her home. So article is not surprising but interesting. She is in her mid-50s and has been able to combine a career with home and child rearing responsibilities.

Why Ask a Man About Women in Architecture?

For a male columnist to interview a famous male architect about why there aren't more famous women architects is not only insipid, but it is also demeaning to those of us who are practicing female architects. Would you like to know why there are not more women in architecture? How about the prevailing glass ceiling effect in the larger, established firms? When I interviewed after college for my first job, I met conference room after conference room full of middle aged men. It became clear after awhile that, if they were going to hire a woman to be their first architectural intern, the main criterion had nothing to do with how well I did in school, my portfolio, my letters of recommendation, my professionalism or anything else. They were looking for "eye candy." In the office I now work, I can say little has changed. No wonder women decide to do something else!

Why Ask a Man About Women in Architecture?

For a male columnist to interview a famous male architect about why there aren't more famous women architects is not only insipid, but it is also demeaning to those of us who are practicing female architects. Would you like to know why there are not more women in architecture? How about the prevailing glass ceiling effect in the larger, established firms? When I interviewed after college for my first job, I met conference room after conference room full of middle aged men. It became clear after awhile that, if they were going to hire a woman to be their first architectural intern, the main criterion had nothing to do with how well I did in school, my portfolio, my letters of recommendation, my professionalism or anything else. They were looking for "eye candy." In the office I now work, I can say little has changed. No wonder women decide to do something else!