Study looks at lessons from involving children in K-12 school design

Some architects admit to being uncomfortable with the unpredictability of kids in the design process.

Photo credit: Jim Pennucci, Wikimedia Commons
August 27, 2014

The Conversation recently published a piece discussing the increasing use of children in design, and about an ongoing study of what architects can learn from children.

The study is being carried out through the University of Sheffield's School of Architecture. Currently completed are two case studies and interviews of 16 architect and landscape architects who have worked with children. 

Here's what we've found interesting in their findings so far:

Pros:
• Interviewed architects stated that children's uninhibited curiosity leads to an alternative process of design
• Children are more focused on experiencing or exploring space than on everyday concerns, meaning that they explore many scenarios adults wouldn't think of
• Children are less likely than adults to censor themselves when brainstorming or evaluating a space

Cons:
• Children can be hard to work with, disruptive (duh!)
• Some architects admitted to being uncomfortable with the unpredictability of kids in the design process

You can check out the whole piece, and see links to more research, here.

         
 

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