Reconstruction Blog
Drew Ballensky is general manager of Duro-Last Roofing, Inc.’s central U.S. facility in Iowa and company spokesman for Duro-Last’s cool roofing, sustainability and architectural education programs. He is past-president of the Chemical Fabrics and Film Association and chairman of CFFA’s Vinyl Roofing Division. Drew earned his bachelor’s degree in industrial technology from the University of Northern Iowa and master’s degree in business administration from Florida State University. Drew has over 29 years experience in business and industry in various engineering and managerial capacities. He has worked in the U.S. and Canadian operations for a major international manufacturer of pre-engineered steel buildings, was a financial analyst with a major athletic apparel manufacturer and was an owner of a general contracting company.
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February 01, 2012

Despite all of the available technology and new green materials available today, retrofitting an existing building is almost always a more sustainable option than tearing an old building down and rebuilding it. The National Trust for Historic Preservation published a new study comparing the environmental impact of retrofitting an old building with tearing it down, trashing the debris, clearing the site, crafting new materials, and putting up a replacement from scratch.

Retrofit an existing building to make it 30% more efficient, the study found, and it will essentially always remain a better bet for the environment than a new building built tomorrow with the same efficiencies. Compare the new building’s life cycle to an average existing structure with no retrofitting, and it could still take up to 80 years for the new one to make up for the environmental impact of its initial construction.
(http://www.ecobuildingpulse.com/news/2012/01-january/2030-challenges-energy-reduction-target-within-reach.aspx)

         
 
 

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