Lynne Simnick

Lynne Simnick is the Director of Code Development for the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) and is responsible for the supervision and oversight of the creation and maintenance of all IAPMO codes and code supporting documents. Ms. Simnick has more than twenty-eight years experience in the plumbing industry including code development, education and training, plan review and evaluation services. Prior to joining IAPMO, Simnick worked as technical staff in engineering services, educator, inspector and plumber. She has a Bachelors of Science Degree in Education and Mechanical Engineering Technology. Simnick has authored many technical articles, participated in numerous standards committees with an expertise in code and standards development. Ms. Simnick may be contacted at IAPMO, 909-472-4110 or email lynne.simnick@IAPMO.org
Posted on December 26, 2012 by Lynne Simnick
The Las Cruces, N.M., City Council has adopted the 2009 editions of International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO’s) complete collection of Uniform Codes — the Uniform Plumbing Code® (UPC), Uniform Mechanical Code® (UMC), Uniform Solar Energy Code® (USEC) and Uniform...
Posted on December 18, 2012 by Lynne Simnick
The Northwest of the U.S. boasts some impressive sustainable building design accomplishments, but it has not incorporated adequate seismic resilience into green standards and codes, says environmental writer Edward Wolf. He argues that the Northwest, an active seismic zone, is at high risk for...
Posted on December 05, 2012 by Lynne Simnick
Damage from Hurricane Sandy has New York City officials and real estate developers reviewing building codes. As they ponder a devastated landscape from the South Street Seaport in Lower Manhattan to the Rockaways in Queens to Midland Beach on Staten Island, new flood protections for all building...
Posted on November 20, 2012 by Lynne Simnick
Sønderborg, Denmark is aiming for a high environmental standard: to be carbon-neutral by 2029. Achieving that ambitious benchmark depends on generating power and heat from renewable sources and making its buildings more energy-efficient. The Project Zero goal is to reduce carbon emissions in the...
Posted on November 11, 2012 by Lynne Simnick
Building automation systems (BAS) will be increasingly necessary to help building owners meet more stringent regulations. With states and communities adopting stricter energy efficiency standards, BAS is likely to become a more important component in meeting these new rules, and will reap savings...
Posted on September 18, 2012 by Lynne Simnick
Water shortages impact many areas of the country, and the use of gray water and rain water is on the rise. Plumbing codes and practices have been refined in recent years to keep up with this trend. The International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials’ 83rd annual Education and...
Posted on August 29, 2012 by Lynne Simnick
When tracking trends in sustainable design, it’s interesting to see where venture capitalists are investing their money in the environmental sector and how technologies that they are funding might impact sustainability standards. Recent investments in green building are focusing on achieving "...
Posted on August 22, 2012 by Lynne Simnick
A wildfire destroyed scores of homes in Kittitas County, Washington, and blazes roared through Colorado Springs and other communities in the parched West this year. These fires struck in areas where development is occurring near forested areas that can become tinder boxes in severe droughts. Ray...
Posted on August 07, 2012 by Lynne Simnick
Energy Star scores and LEED certifications do not always equate to optimal energy efficiency, according to efficiency specialists. "We found [just] 45% savings in a LEED Platinum building; it was actually an energy hog," says the vice president of marketing for Retroficiency, a start-up firm...
Posted on July 31, 2012 by Lynne Simnick
The development of low-energy buildings is stunted, asserts sustainable building guru Jerry Yudelson, and he has a provocative explanation for his view. “Most engineers and architects know how to deliver low-energy buildings, but don’t do it because they don’t use or follow integrated design...