Strategies for providing great customer service

Customers are inherently inefficient and inconvenient to do business with, writes Customer Service Consultant Micah Solomon, in a recent Forbes post. That’s why he believes great customer service depends on understanding this. SPONSORED CONTENT

August 21, 2014 |
Gabe Savely

Illustration: Stuart Miles via FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Customers are inherently inefficient and inconvenient to do business with, writes Customer Service Consultant Micah Solomon, in a recent Forbes post. That’s why he believes great customer service depends on understanding this fact and figuring out how to build a customer experience that accommodates it.

We recently asked Matt Shaw, Design & Project Management at Doud BTS, Inc. in Colorado, to share his customer service perspectives in an Insight Warehouse Tip on the Starbuildings blog. In a brief video, Shaw talks about the importance of keeping the lines of communications open with his clients, especially when facing a missed deadline. 

Solomon believes you can only provide a great customer experience if you adjust your scheduling, staffing and resources to match the schedule and wishes of customers. 

“You can’t give great customer service if you do it only on your own schedule, and only in ways that improve your own efficiency and help you hit your internal benchmarks, while ignoring those of your customer,” he writes.

That means anticipating clients’ needs ahead of time, because “just in time” can be too late.

“The one thing that Lean methodology and customer service excellence agree on most clearly is this: Value is determined by your customers,” Solomon writes. “If it takes a thousand ‘’inefficient’’ experiences to create loyal customers with confidence in us, so be it.”

While that meticulous attention to customer needs can be challenging, satisfied customers value their business partners and are loyal to them. 

“In service-focused businesses, our customers don’t tend to quantify the source of their happiness with precision,” he writes. “Instead, they come away from our efforts to serve them with a generalized glow, a vague feeling that they like us and want to return, and (we hope) a desire to tell their friends about us.”

Read more from Forbes.

Read more from the Starbuildings blog. 

Editor's note: This is sponsored content. The text was provided by the sponsor company.

Gabe Savely | Metal Building Trends
Star Building Systems
Director at Star Building Systems

Gabe Savely first joined Star in 1999 as a programmer analyst after receiving his degree in Computer Science & Management. In 2001, Gabe was promoted to Manager of SBS and was instrumental in the continual development of SBS as the industry leading software it is today. In 2004, Gabe accepted the challenge of the Corporate IT Director position supporting software development for all of the RCC & NCI buildings divisions. Gabe became Director of Product Management-Customer Solutions in 2008 as part of the IT Technical Services group. In 2011, Gabe re-joined the compnay as Director of Star Building Systems. While not at work, he enjoys spending time with his wife, Rebecca, and their two daughters, Sarah and Shelby. There isn’t a sport his daughters have played that Gabe hasn’t been involved in as a Coach. 

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