Air Terminal Sector Giants: Morphing TSA procedures shape terminal design [2014 Giants 300 Report]

Shortage of post-security dining options, restrooms among top issues in terminal design

The 130,000-sf Great Hall in the central terminal at Seattle-Tacoma Internationa
The 130,000-sf Great Hall in the central terminal at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport offers a glass curtain wall with plenty of natural light and an unobstructed view of the runway. Passengers can buy food in the post-security Pacific Marketplace and grab a front row seat to watch planes take off and land. PHOTO: JAMES P. SCHOLZ, COURTESY FENTRESS ARCHITECTS
August 11, 2014

The recent evolution of airport terminals has been prompted largely by different patterns of passenger behavior in a post-9/11 world. Passengers have learned get to the airport earlier. They spend less time browsing pre-security retail, opting to queue up in often-lengthy security lines well before boarding. The result? Overcrowding in post-security areas, where retail and dining options have historically been lacking. 

Curtis Fentress, Principal-in-Charge of design at Fentress Architects, says greater passenger volume has strained gate and restroom capabilities. In addition, the recent popularity of low-cost airlines has increased demand for post-security dining options.

“Many carriers don’t provide any food on the airplane,” Fentress says. “So the people who are getting to the airport earlier to make sure they get through security are waiting, and they want something to eat. If there’s any kind of flight delay, they know they might be stuck in the airport or stuck up in the air for a while without any food.”

Airports are scrambling to respond with renovations and new terminals, even as they deal with TSA rules that can change in an instant. From CTX scanners—van-sized x-ray machines used to examine checked bags—to passenger scanners, the range of large equipment that terminals must accommodate just keeps morphing. Building Teams and their clients are adopting structural tactics that support change.

“We’re using more steel, which allows us to make longer distances between columns,” Fentress says. “The more long-span construction you can do, the more flexibility you have in the future.”

 

Top Air Terminal Sector Architecture Firms

Rank Company 2013 Air Terminal Revenue Revenue
1 HOK $47,074,837
2 Gensler 35,675,000
3 Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates 30,792,300
4 Corgan 26,376,420
5 Fentress Architects 26,333,785
6 Stantec 22,650,631
7 RS&H 22,050,000
8 Skidmore, Owings & Merrill 20,454,225
9 PGAL 17,120,000
10 Heery International 13,057,793
11 HNTB Corp. 10,900,639
12 Leo A Daly 9,490,737
13 Gresham, Smith and Partners 6,733,000
14 SchenkelShultz Architecture 6,179,000
15 HKS 4,087,622
16 LS3P 3,282,241
17 Morris Architects 2,795,000
18 Clark Nexsen 2,214,183
19 Solomon Cordwell Buenz 1,700,000
20 CTA Architects Engineers 1,187,913
21 ZGF Architects 929,658
22 BRPH 925,000
23 Epstein 762,000
24 RTKL Associates 677,000
25 Integrus Architecture 641,695
26 Ware Malcomb 196,500
27 Rosser International 158,668
28 JRS Architect 135,000
29 Environetics 112,443
30 Parkhill, Smith & Cooper 92,000
31 Cuningham Group Architecture 44,964
32 Beyer Blinder Belle 9,544
33 Perkins+will 6,836
34 Ratio Architects 5,368

 

 

Top Air Terminal Sector Engineering Firms

Rank Company 2013 Air Terminal Revenue Revenue
1 Jacobs $118,990,000
2 URS Corp. 83,069,612
3 Burns & McDonnell 48,010,000
4 Parsons Brinckerhoff 27,025,899
5 Arup 21,447,760
6 Leidos 16,810,000
7 Ross & Baruzzini 12,814,720
8 AECOM Technology Corp. 9,630,000
9 STV 5,260,000
10 WSP Group 3,640,000
11 KPFF Consulting Engineers 3,125,000
12 Syska Hennessy Group 2,933,760
13 TLC Engineering for Architecture 1,984,605
14 TTG 1,653,250
15 Thornton Tomasetti 1,620,411
16 Walter P Moore and Associates 1,596,212
17 Sparling 1,583,537
18 Stanley Consultants 1,526,482
19 Aon Fire Protection Engineering Corp. 1,500,000
20 Graef 1,267,799
21 RMF Engineering 1,200,000
22 Coffman Engineers 1,139,884
23 Magnusson Klemencic Associates 1,068,015
24 RDK Engineers 870,000
25 Vanderweil Engineers 856,900
26 Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates 550,000
27 Simpson Gumpertz & Heger 550,000
28 Martin/Martin 494,691
29 M-E Engineers 400,000
30 Newcomb & Boyd 351,932
31 Zak Companies 351,488
32 I. C. Thomasson Associates 300,000
33 Davis, Bowen & Friedel 257,524
34 Guernsey 252,705
35 Environmental Systems Design 198,068
36 CTLGroup 180,000
37 Joseph R. Loring & Associates 175,000
38 Heapy Engineering 172,189
39 Barge Waggoner Sumner & Cannon 150,000
40 GRW 138,862
41 Wallace Engineering 131,000
42 Dunham Associates 90,000
43 CJL Engineering 81,400
44 KJWW Engineering Consultants 81,358
45 P2S Engineering 50,418
46 Smith Seckman Reid 44,419
47 Bridgers & Paxton Consulting Engineers 38,111
48 Spectrum Engineers 16,993
49 Brinjac Engineering 12,515
50 French & Parrello Associates 9,215
51 AKF Group 6,000

 

 

Top Air Terminal Sector Construction Firms

Rank Company 2013 Air Terminal Revenue Revenue
1 Turner Construction $487,680,000
2 Hensel Phelps 418,780,000
3 PCL Construction 328,069,635
4 Walsh Group, The 315,399,703
5 Austin Commercial 267,162,953
6 Suffolk Construction 170,270,605
7 Balfour Beatty US 154,058,403
8 Clark Group 131,741,104
9 McCarthy Holdings 127,000,000
10 Manhattan Construction 119,660,000
11 Hunt Construction Group 109,000,000
12 URS Corp. 83,069,612
13 Hill International 55,000,000
14 Flintco 54,400,000
15 Walbridge 46,000,000
16 Skanska USA 45,635,393
17 Lend Lease 35,107,000
18 Weitz Company, The 33,745,047
19 HITT Contracting 27,200,000
20 Parsons Brinckerhoff 27,025,899
21 Brasfield & Gorrie 25,926,312
22 Gilbane 22,031,250
23 Tutor Perini Corp. 19,320,308
24 New South Construction 18,923,000
25 BlueScope Construction 18,631,283
26 O'Neil Industries/W.E. O'Neil 18,433,037
27 Holder Construction 13,132,000
28 Heery International 13,057,793
29 Yates Companies, The 12,900,000
30 Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., The 11,991,159
31 Beck Group, The 11,096,174
32 EMJ Corp. 10,000,000
33 James McHugh Construction 9,527,392
34 Robins & Morton 6,370,178
35 Messer Construction 5,994,758
36 W. M. Jordan Company 5,812,917
37 STV 5,260,000
38 Hill & Wilkinson 4,766,000
39 Consigli Construction 3,278,099
40 Kraus-Anderson Construction 3,000,000
41 Sundt Construction 1,564,147
42 JE Dunn Construction 1,239,884
43 Hoffman Construction 1,000,000
44 Hoar Construction 4,000

 

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