Seismic Design http://www.bdcnetwork.com/ en 7 game-changing trends in structural engineering http://www.bdcnetwork.com/course/7-game-changing-trends-structural-engineering <span>7 game-changing trends in structural engineering</span> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Mark Larsen, PE, SE, and Blair Hanuschak, PE, SE, Walter P Moore</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/dbarista" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dbarista</span></span> <span>Fri, 10/15/2021 - 11:55</span> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/2021-10/7%20Game-Changing%20Trends%20in%20Structural%20Engineering%20Walter%20P%20Moore%20AIA%20course%20Globe%20Life%20Field.jpg" width="3000" height="2250" alt="7 game-changing trends in structural engineering" title="Globe Life Field, home of the Texas Rangers, represents the innovation in structural engineering that is occurring at the grass roots level by professionals who are exhilarated by technology and continually incorporating creative new ideas. Photo: © HKS – Daryl Shields" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Here are seven key areas where innovation in structural engineering is driving evolution.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Exciting and unique buildings increasingly dot the landscape of our urban environments and beautifully fill the pages of our design magazines. Conversely, over the past half century the construction industry has “been slow to adopt new technologies” and “has undergone no fundamental change,” according to the World Economic Forum.</p> <p>The built environment, which consists of construction plus real estate, represents almost $6 trillion in U.S. GDP per year. It is the largest industry in the U.S. Compared to industries such as automotive, aerospace, and manufacturing, however, construction lags significantly in productivity growth and R&amp;D spending. Are we falling behind the innovation trajectory of other industries? What are the reasons our industry has struggled to evolve with respect to productivity? Is technology keeping pace in AEC? </p> <p>While the industry works to tackle these questions and issues, there are many firms experimenting and pushing the envelope in compelling ways. In the realm of structural engineering, innovation is occurring at the grass roots level by professionals who are exhilarated by technology and continually incorporating creative new ideas. The following are seven key areas where innovation in structural engineering is driving evolution.</p> <h2>1. Integrated Digital Platform</h2> <p>The AEC industry utilizes technology for processes such as advanced structural analysis, modeling of complex geometry, and schedule planning. However, the industry overall is poorly connected from a digital standpoint across firms and across platforms. A typical building project might have a team of six to 10 design consulting firms, and a contractor with 10−20 subcontractors interacting with the ownership team. Each of these entities does important work with varying levels of technological sophistication, but the level of technology connectivity within each entity and between entities is often rudimentary at best. </p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Structural engineering firms that create their own Integrated Digital Platforms, which involve a community of tools, processes, and people that facilitate and drive the flow of data, information, and knowledge across delivery systems, to communicate seamlessly internally and with project partners. " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="305550cd-4094-4427-87cd-6407da6fc127" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/LMNA%20Exploded%20Wall%20Section%202.png" width="1067" height="701" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Structural engineering firms that create their own Integrated Digital Platforms, which involve a community of tools, processes, and people that facilitate and drive the flow of data, information, and knowledge across delivery systems, to communicate seamlessly internally and with project partners.  </figcaption></figure><p>Several highly specialized firms in the structural engineering space are creating their own integrated digital platforms that allow them to communicate seamlessly internally and with project partners. These platforms involve a community of tools, processes, and people that facilitate and drive the flow of data, information, and knowledge across their delivery systems. This goes beyond using Revit to model a structure in 3D and sharing that model with subconsultants. This also goes beyond having a small group of specialists who create bespoke software tools to improve design. These digital platforms are broad, and the engineers, modelers, and project managers are working constantly in building information modeling (BIM). </p> <p>At these high-performing firms, tools such as Rhino and Grasshopper are ubiquitous in every design office because teams utilize visual programming and parametric modeling as core processes. At Walter P Moore, for example, we have a team of programmers/engineers who are writing and updating programs to transfer data from analysis programs, Revit, Tekla, Rhino, and others to a central database. This central database allows us to keep metadata and to add metadata as the data flows from program to program. This process transforms simple data into powerful, fabrication-ready information that can be served up for designers, clients, and contractors. This is game-changing in the AEC industry and will drive project delivery evolution for the future.</p> <h2>2. Visual Programming and Parametric Modeling</h2> <p>Design programs have been used by engineers for decades to design building elements. The scope of these individual design programs is quite narrow, and there is little or no connectivity to the hundreds of other design processes that take place on every project. Engineers design beams in one program and then manually transfer key information to drawings or to BIM. They use spreadsheets to design footings, pile caps, and dozens of other structural components and then transfer critical data from one place to the next. Savvy engineering firms have their own in-house programming capabilities that allow them to customize or mold commercially available software, or to create their own programs that do what they need to do.</p> <p>Visual programming provides an avenue to improve this tremendously. Platforms such as Grasshopper offer a visual programming interface that allows the programming logic to be readily seen, understood, and implemented. Visual programming can be leveraged broadly, which allows engineers to write simple programs that connect disparate processes and improve the speed and the efficiency of the design process. This process improvement is exciting and rewarding for staff, and it provides value to clients on every project.</p> <p>An additional benefit of visual programming is that it allows a firm to rapidly expand their parametric modeling capabilities. Parametric modeling refers to the process of establishing parameters of a design that are allowed to be variable, setting criteria for how those parameters can vary, and then running multiple analyses to obtain the final design of the system over the entire range of parameter steps. For example, this process can be used to vary the depth and spacing of steel trusses over an airport terminal such that the steel tonnage is minimized. This type of parametric modeling allows users to analyze multiple options for clients in real time. Once the parametric model is created using a visual programming platform, engineers can iterate options in seconds and the information can be shared visually with clients.</p> <h2>3. Advanced Model-Based Deliverables </h2> <p>BIM provides the ability to create 3D content and has become the standard of the industry for the built environment. The assumption could be made that all design teams are providing high-quality 3D content that can be used robustly for construction. However, that is not the case. There are a few reasons for this:</p> <ul><li>Liability concerns by design teams of handing over electronic BIM information are significant.</li> <li>There is a difference in modeling building components in BIM for general coordination versus modeling with the precision needed for an electronic deliverable. Small imperfections in model geometry or metadata can create significant problems if that information is relied upon by a contractor.</li> <li>Oftentimes, only primary building components are modeled in the design phase with no integration of secondary members and no detailed modeling of complex member connections.</li> <li>BIM programs that are used for design are different from the programs used by subcontractors for fabrication.</li> </ul><figure role="group"><img alt="Structural engineering firms are addressing the disconnect between the potential of BIM and the status quo by taking the steps necessary to create advanced model-based deliverables." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="860bc6cf-f549-41bb-8d7e-80b92a0084d3" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/2.%20SECONDARY%20IMAGE%20Concrete%20Joint%20Sans%20Concrete.jpg" width="1900" height="1200" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Structural engineering firms are addressing the disconnect between the potential of BIM and the status quo by taking the steps necessary to create advanced model-based deliverables.</figcaption></figure><p>The disconnect between the potential of BIM and the status quo represents a major opportunity for improvement. Some structural engineering firms in the AEC space are tackling this gap by taking the steps necessary to create advanced model-based deliverables. This requires modeling in BIM delivery programs such as Revit with precision that can be relied upon, including both primary and secondary members, complex geometry, and connections. </p> <p>An extension of this improvement is for structural engineers to work directly in fabrication-level programs such as Tekla, which allows engineers to provide information to subcontractors in the language and format they need. To realize the full potential of these advanced model-based deliverables, they must be transmitted to the contractor and be relied upon for construction. </p> <p>Many structural engineers and architects are not ready for these steps, as the risks are apparent. However, the benefits of building virtually via model-based deliverables and coordinating with the contractor before structural materials show up on site are clear. Fewer changes in the field, better control of structural quantities, and reduced (or zero) change orders are some of the important outcomes that are being realized in this process. </p> <h2>4. Integration of Multiple Services with Core Structural Engineering</h2> <p>Specialization in AEC has fueled the development of deep expertise among individual consultants, which has allowed engineers and architects to push the boundaries of design. At the same time, however, specialization has also hardened boundaries between disciplines and created the potential for scope gaps and coordination issues. Some structural engineering firms are bridging these gaps by expanding their scopes, including disciplines beyond structural in their core delivery, and providing a more integrated design. </p> <p>Oftentimes, the basic structural engineering scope stops at primary members and the edge of slab at each level of the building. However, by taking the additional responsibility for designing and delivering all secondary members, and by including steel connections, embed plates, and cladding supports, the scope of the full structural system is delivered. Some firms are adding robust enclosure design services, including optioneering of materials and systems, design of cladding members, and modeling of core cladding components. This creates a much more robust delivery of the entire building core and shell and allows for greater coordination. </p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Q2 Stadium, home of Austin FC, is an example of why structural engineers are an important part of the design and construction industry, and represent many of the changes in how the industry works to fuel innovation in the built environment. " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="3b7f8009-8469-4f33-97c7-5ad214a0b233" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/Q2%20Austin%20FC.jpg" width="1800" height="1013" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Q2 Stadium, home of Austin FC, is an example of why structural engineers are an important part of the design and construction industry, and represent many of the changes in how the industry works to fuel innovation in the built environment. Photo: Austin FC </figcaption></figure><p>The addition of services such as erection engineering, especially for complex structures, ensures that the design intent is followed through all the way to construction. Additionally, high fidelity modeling of rebar in concrete structures or of structural steel buildings can also expedite the transition from design to shop drawings to construction. </p> <p>The inclusion of specialty services such as threat and risk assessment and mitigation, and designs to resist extreme loadings, protection from blast, progressive collapse, and other potential threats creates more holistic design solutions.</p> <p>Firms that can combine these design services in an integrated fashion bring immense value to their architectural clients, owners, and contractors.</p> <h2>5. Sustainable Design </h2> <p>Sustainability in the built environment is an important concern for our generation and for generations to come. Structural engineers have engaged in this issue so minimally in the past that few expect us to be experts with solutions to share. This is changing rapidly. Structural engineers are responsible for specifying and designing most of the mass and a significant percentage of the cost of every building. The impact that we are having on sustainability is profound. </p> <p>Understanding embodied carbon and leading conversations about the impacts of design decisions is critical. Structural engineers are in the driver’s seat to understand the impact of material choices and system decisions. Gone are the days when the structural engineer’s contribution to sustainability discussions was limited to utilizing fly ash in concrete. </p> <figure role="group"><img alt="For designers to truly understand embodied carbon, they must know its origin, how buildings impact the amount of carbon in the environment, and the consequences of excessive carbon in the atmosphere." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="fa8cb720-03df-41cb-8d93-bc79ec48a6c3" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/3.%20SECONDARY%20IMAGE%20Embodied%20Carbon%20Dashboard%20Snapshot.jpg" width="1800" height="1068" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>For designers to truly understand embodied carbon, they must know its origin, how buildings impact the amount of carbon in the environment, and the consequences of excessive carbon in the atmosphere.</figcaption></figure><p>The first step for designers is to truly understand embodied carbon—where it originates, how buildings impact the amount of carbon in the environment, and the consequences of excessive carbon in the atmosphere. The second step is to accurately know and robustly track the quantities of structural elements. The third step is to develop workflows as designers that allow us to analyze and understand the effects of material choices by connecting quantities to programs such as Tally and Embodied Carbon in Construction Calculator (EC3). The last step is to engage with this information throughout the design process, provide structural options for evaluating carbon impact with other important design factors, and serve as experts in making recommendations to the overall design team and the owner. </p> <p>Engineers that provide material quantity tracking of structural—and enclosure—materials within their models and in their deliverables provide a two-fold benefit to the project. First, the material quantity tracking can feed into the measurement and tracking of embodied carbon in the structure. Secondly, they communicate to the owner, estimators, and builders the evolution of the material quantities—and hence costs—throughout the design process. The transparency of generating and sharing this information is of benefit to the project.</p> <p>In 2020, several structural engineering companies became signatory firms that are leading the SE2050 Commitment, with a goal of achieving substantive embodied carbon reductions in the design and construction of their projects. </p> <h2>6. Performance-based Design in Seismic, Wind, and Fire</h2> <p>With the goal of providing safe buildings to protect the public, building codes have evolved to focus heavily on prescriptive design. This approach involves strict requirements on structural design process, materials, strength, and detailing. The current code-based approach provides life-safety performance level of structures. However, this prescriptive approach does not allow structural engineers to take varying design paths to attain code-level performance, nor does it distinguish between higher levels of performance. As structural engineers, we are attempting to weave multiple goals together for the overall design safety, code compliance, constructability, serviceability, reliability, first cost, and life-cycle cost. To truly accomplish this, alternative approaches are sometimes required.</p> <p>Performance-based design (PBD) is the concept of starting with the end goal as the primary goal (i.e., the performance level), and then using analysis, simulation, and testing to demonstrate that a structure will meet that performance level. This process may draw heavily on concepts in prescriptive design, but it also allows for innovation and targeted solutions for unique problems. PBD can fuel innovation and it can create tremendous value for a client. Highly qualified design firms with top-notch analysis capabilities and deep expertise are required to ensure that PBD is implemented correctly. PBD is not an answer for every building, but for the right projects—complex, tall, iconic, or important—PBD is the right solution. </p> <p>A primary implementation of PBD is to target performance objectives related to a specific hazard, with seismic, wind, and fire being at the forefront of the hazards to tackle. Seismic design has a strong history over the past couple of decades of creating viable paths to PBD. Clearly defining the probability of seismic shaking, determining the performance of the structure being designed, allowing the structural engineer to design the right solution for the goal, and implementing a peer review process are all critical steps in the implementation of PBD for seismic. </p> <p>The wind design community has followed the lead of its seismic counterparts and has made strides along this path recently. In 2019, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) released a pre-standard for PBD Wind, setting the stage for a comprehensive approach to alternative design for wind loading. This alternative approach allows for the evaluation of safety, performance level, building drift, occupant comfort, and response to extreme wind events. </p> <p>PBD for fire is in its infancy stage, but the applicability of being able to target designs for fire performance could be extremely broad. The Charles Pankow Foundation provided a large grant for advanced research in this area, and in 2020 ASCE published Performance-Based Structural Fire Design: Exemplar Designs of Four Regionally Diverse Buildings Using ASCE 7-16, Appendix E. </p> <h2>7. Use of New Materials and High-performance Fabric</h2> <p>For many years, the palate of core materials for structural engineers has been very stable. Concrete, steel, masonry, and wood have been the main building blocks for generations. At the same time, there are exciting things happening on the fringes of these core materials that are providing new design avenues for engineers, architects, and owners. </p> <p>Innovative ways to use timber is one such example. The drive for more sustainable buildings has helped mass timber become an extremely sought-after material choice. With this drive for more mass timber, advances have been made in several areas: building codes have allowed expanded use of mass timber systems, fire resistance has been researched in more depth, and innovative systems such as cross-laminated timber (CLT) have opened new avenues for design implementation. </p> <p>Another example is the growing use of high-performance fabric in buildings. Structural fabric is a high-end material that derives its form and its strength from tension. By combining structural support elements with fabric, engineers can design engaging and innovative building cladding, roofs, and canopies. Material choices for the fabric can provide the ability to vary the amount of light transmission from clear to opaque and can allow designers to tune characteristics such as flame resistance, weather resistance, and strength. </p> <p>The future will provide opportunities to evolve the current generation of fabrics by allowing designers to increase the strength of fabrics and be able to tune the UV transmission without impacting the ability to see through the fabric. </p> <p>Structural engineers are an important part of the design and construction industry, and many of the exciting changes in how we work are fueling innovation in the built environment. With continued use of technology in designing and documenting our work, forward-thinking use of materials, and enhanced collaboration with design and construction partners, we will continue to improve outcomes in our building projects.</p> <p><strong>About the Authors</strong><br /> Mark Larsen, PE, SE, is a Managing Principal and Director of Operations of the Structures Group at Walter P Moore. He can be reached at mlarsen@walterpmoore.com. Blair Hanuschak, PE, SE, is a Managing Principal and Executive Director of the Structures Group at Walter P Moore. He can be reached at bhanuschak@walterpmoore.com.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdc" hreflang="en">BD+C</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/10-aia-luhsw" hreflang="en">1.0 AIA LU/HSW</a></div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/structural" hreflang="en">Structural</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/design-trends" hreflang="en">Design Trends</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/10-aia-luhsw" hreflang="en">1.0 AIA LU/HSW</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/green-and-sustainability" hreflang="en">Green and sustainability</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/firelife-safetysecurity" hreflang="en">Fire/Life safety/Security</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/steelsteel-framesteel-joists" hreflang="en">Steel/Steel frame/Steel joists</a></div> </div> <div style="margin-top: -10px;"> <button class="uk-button uk-button-secondary uk-margin-small-top uk-first-column"> <a target="_blank" href="/node/<a href="/campus/bdc" hreflang="en">BD+C</a>"> More content from this provider </a> </button> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/mass-timber" hreflang="en">Mass Timber</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/aec-tech" hreflang="en">AEC Tech</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/aec-tech/bim-and-information-technology" hreflang="en">BIM and Information Technology</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdc-university-course" hreflang="en">BD+C University Course</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/contractors" hreflang="en">Contractors</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers" hreflang="en">Designers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers-specifiers-landscape-architects" hreflang="en">Designers / Specifiers / Landscape Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/engineers" hreflang="en">Engineers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/architects" hreflang="en">Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/building-owner" hreflang="en">Building Owners</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-technology" hreflang="en">Building Technology</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/continuing-education-and-life-time-learning" hreflang="en">Continuing Education and Life Time Learning</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/fire-rated-products/fire-and-life-safety" hreflang="en">Fire and Life Safety</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/products-and-materials/structural-materials" hreflang="en">Structural Materials</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/structural-materials/steel-construction" hreflang="en">Steel Construction</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/structural-materials/wood" hreflang="en">Wood</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdc-university-course" hreflang="en">BD+C University Course</a></div> <div class="uk-margin">Off</div> Fri, 15 Oct 2021 16:55:12 +0000 dbarista 49235 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Vancouver’s building codes may underplay seismic hazard http://www.bdcnetwork.com/vancouvers-building-codes-may-underplay-seismic-hazard <span>Vancouver’s building codes may underplay seismic hazard</span> <div class="uk-margin">0</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/dbarista" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dbarista</span></span> <span>Wed, 03/31/2021 - 14:13</span> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><p> Vancouver, Canada’s third largest metropolitan area, has the country’s highest seismic risk.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p> Peter Fabris, Contributing Editor</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/vancouver-2613994_1280.jpg" width="1280" height="853" alt="Vancouver’s building codes may underplay seismic hazard" title="Vancouver’s building codes may underplay seismic hazard" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p> Simulations show tall concrete buildings could be vulnerable</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p> Vancouver, Canada’s third largest metropolitan area, has the country’s <a href="https://temblor.net/earthquake-insights/high-rises-at-risk-building-codes-underestimate-vancouvers-seismic-hazard-12522" target="_blank">highest seismic risk</a>.</p> <p> Recent simulations suggest that existing models used to develop current building codes have underestimated the region’s seismic hazard, according to a new study led by researchers from the University of British Columbia. Vancouver is surrounded by mountains and lies in a basin composed of deep sedimentary deposits near the Cascadia Subduction Zone, an active tectonic plate boundary.</p> <p> This geology is softer and less compact than the surrounding bedrock, and will amplify shaking caused by seismic waves, researchers say. This makes high-rises in the city more vulnerable to damage from a major earthquake than in other regions.</p> <p> Ground motion models serve as the foundation for Canada’s national seismic hazard model, and they typically rely on past observations of earthquakes from around the world. Seismic codes are based on these, but do not account for Vancouver’s particular geology. Tall buildings constructed before 1990 are most at risk.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/vancouvers-building-codes-may-underplay-seismic-hazard" data-a2a-title="Vancouver’s building codes may underplay seismic hazard"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Fvancouvers-building-codes-may-underplay-seismic-hazard&amp;title=Vancouver%E2%80%99s%20building%20codes%20may%20underplay%20seismic%20hazard"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Wed, 31 Mar 2021 19:13:28 +0000 dbarista 46377 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Plan ahead when building in the west http://www.bdcnetwork.com/blog/plan-ahead-when-building-west <span>Plan ahead when building in the west</span> <div class="uk-margin">1</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/dmalone" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dmalone</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/20/2017 - 13:00</span> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team" hreflang="en">Building Team</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Getting a project through plan review can be an unusually long process, anywhere from six months to two years.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/iStock-172640672%5B2%5D.jpg" width="800" height="527" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/architects" hreflang="en">Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/engineers" hreflang="en">Engineers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>The west coast states present a special challenge to builders. The area is seismically active and as such has complex building codes for California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and Idaho.  Getting a project through plan review can be an unusually long process, anywhere from six months to two years.</p> <p>Generally speaking, in most jurisdictions, the code official has wide latitude in the types of questions he or she can ask, or the information that can be requested, before approving a project. The review officials are broadly empowered to protect the safety of people in the jurisdiction; especially in an area that includes high seismic activity.</p> <p>When they review the drawings and calculations, officials often question things that appear incorrect or are not clearly understood. They may ask the engineer of record to justify some of the values. This can certainly make an engineer feel untrustworthy; however, it’s really just an official who is trying to do the job right. </p> <p>The review process can get be delayed by these questions. If the reviewer sends a letter with a list of questions, the builder needs to provide explanations. Sometimes the builder needs further assistance with the plan checker’s comments from suppliers or sub-contractors.  And of course, this back and forth doesn’t happen instantly. The plan checker’s letter to a <a href="http://www.starbuildings.com/" target="_blank">Star Builder</a> gets passed along to the engineers at Star who respond to the parts that pertain to the metal building system. The builder then forwards the answers back to the official. Building departments typically have long queues of projects under review, and every round of question-and-answer has to wait. </p> <p>Another thing that certainly delay approval – and drive builders crazy – is that codes get updated, and a building can get caught between codes. For example, a project gets submitted to Star for design, and is engineered according to the currently applicable code.  Sometimes, by the time the project is submitted to plan check and waited for review, the code has been changed. The project gets sent back for re-design costing the builder time and money. Typically, cities change their adoption on the first of January, the first of June, and sometimes the first of October. Builders should exercise caution during those times of year and ask the officials of any imminent changes with the current building codes.</p> <p>With all that said, there is one way to assist with the speed of the approval process. Builders who have a good relationship with their building department seem to get their projects through more quickly. When builders simply drop the calculations and drawings on the desk and leave, the projects seem to go through more rounds of questions and answers. However, when a builder takes the time to make an appointment, submit the plans, and carefully walk the official through the project with the codes and loads, it generally makes the approval process smoother. The questions tend to come out right away, not weeks later, and more often than not can be answered on the spot. At the very least, the builder can get a clear understanding of what needs to be addressed and come back with an effective response.  </p> <p><a href="http://www.starbuildings.com/" target="_blank">Star</a> continually stresses to our builders the need to go talk to their local code officials. This certainly applies everywhere in the country, but in the west, it seems to make even more of a difference.</p> </div> Tue, 20 Jun 2017 18:00:35 +0000 dmalone 40787 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Risk of man-made earthquakes now factor in seismic hazard analysis http://www.bdcnetwork.com/risk-man-made-earthquakes-now-factor-seismic-hazard-analysis <span>Risk of man-made earthquakes now factor in seismic hazard analysis</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mchamernik" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mchamernik</span></span> <span>Thu, 07/28/2016 - 09:35</span> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Significant risk increases seen in some areas of the U.S.</p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Peter Fabris, Contributing Editor</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/Water_tanks_preparing_for_a_frac_job.jpeg" width="1000" height="573" alt="Risk of man-made earthquakes now factor in seismic hazard analysis" title="Risk of man-made earthquakes now factor in seismic hazard analysis" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Significant risk increases seen in some areas of the U.S.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/resources/codes-and-standards" hreflang="en">Codes and Standards</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/resiliency" hreflang="en">Resiliency</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>A few years ago, a 5.6 magnitude earthquake believed to have been caused by injection of waste water from fracking operations into the subsurface struck Oklahoma.</p> <p>The temblor damaged highways, toppled chimneys, and caused other damage. Last year, there were nearly 900 earthquakes above 3.0 on the Richter scale in the state, and others have been recorded in regions were fracking is underway.</p> <p>As a result, assessment of seismic risk has changed to include these <a href="http://www.globest.com/sites/partnerESI/2016/06/29/the-impact-of-human-induced-earthquakes-on-commercial-real-estate/" target="_blank">human-caused earthquakes</a>. Building codes in the area have not been adjusted to take into consideration the increased risk of damage, though.</p> <p>Developers should consider constructing new buildings with appropriate seismic standards in affected regions, and consider this risk when evaluating their insurance policies.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/risk-man-made-earthquakes-now-factor-seismic-hazard-analysis" data-a2a-title="Risk of man-made earthquakes now factor in seismic hazard analysis"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Frisk-man-made-earthquakes-now-factor-seismic-hazard-analysis&amp;title=Risk%20of%20man-made%20earthquakes%20now%20factor%20in%20seismic%20hazard%20analysis"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Thu, 28 Jul 2016 14:35:11 +0000 mchamernik 38211 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Arup ensures Mexico City concrete skyscraper can withstand seismic activity http://www.bdcnetwork.com/arup-ensures-mexico-city-concrete-skyscraper-can-withstand-seismic-activity <span>Arup ensures Mexico City concrete skyscraper can withstand seismic activity</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mchamernik" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mchamernik</span></span> <span>Wed, 07/20/2016 - 14:46</span> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/concrete" hreflang="en">Concrete</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Double-V hangers and irregularly spaced gaps allow the structure to bend.</p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Mike Chamernik, Associate Editor</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/1reforma.jpg" width="802" height="411" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Double-V hangers and irregularly spaced gaps allow the structure to bend.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/concrete" hreflang="en">Concrete</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-sector-reports/high-rise-construction" hreflang="en">High-rise Construction</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Mexico City is only 31 years removed from a devastating earthquake that killed 5,000 people. </p> <p>Triangular buildings have a tendency to twist when subjected to lateral loads, wind, and earthquake forces.</p> <p>These two facts aren’t stopping Arup, the engineer, and L. Benjamin Romano Arquitects, the designer, from building the 57-story Torre Reforma in Mexico’s capital.</p> <p>The tower is reinforced so efficiently that computer simulations determined that it can withstand all earthquake activity for 2,500 years.</p> <p><a href="http://www.curbed.com/2016/1/15/10846070/torre-reforma-skyscraper-mexico-city-tallest-exposed-concrete" target="_blank">Curbed reports</a> that the 800-foot-tall building has a series of double-V hangers and irregularly spaced gaps that give room for the concrete to constrict, allowing the structure to bend. Also, a 10-story basement provides additional support at its base.</p> <p>The architects chose concrete because it will block out the sun and keep the building cooler, and because the thick walls will allow the building to support itself without steel columns. This means cheaper construction costs, and more importantly, open floor plans. The triangular peak of the building will also contain elevators and egress stairways, freeing up even more room.</p> <p>The $100 million tower, which has office and retail space, is seeking LEED Platinum certification. </p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/arup-ensures-mexico-city-concrete-skyscraper-can-withstand-seismic-activity" data-a2a-title="Arup ensures Mexico City concrete skyscraper can withstand seismic activity"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Farup-ensures-mexico-city-concrete-skyscraper-can-withstand-seismic-activity&amp;title=Arup%20ensures%20Mexico%20City%20concrete%20skyscraper%20can%20withstand%20seismic%20activity"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Wed, 20 Jul 2016 19:46:55 +0000 mchamernik 38021 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com How design mitigates environmental stressors http://www.bdcnetwork.com/blog/how-design-mitigates-environmental-stressors <span>How design mitigates environmental stressors</span> <div class="uk-margin">0</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mchamernik" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mchamernik</span></span> <span>Tue, 07/05/2016 - 10:36</span> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>For employees, certain design strategies can lessen stress, improve health, and promote a greater sense of community connectivity, writes Perkins+Will project manager Jon Penndorf.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Jon Penndorf</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/3f3rqg2erg2e3g23g2g.jpg" width="1000" height="573" alt="For employees, certain design strategies can lessen stress, improve health, and promote a greater sense of community connectivity, writes Perkins+Will project manager Jon Penndorf." title="For employees, certain design strategies can lessen stress, improve health, and promote a greater sense of community connectivity, writes Perkins+Will project manager Jon Penndorf." typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>When we talk about designing for climate adaptation, we first and foremost concern ourselves with the preservation and protection of human life.  While the understood goal of resilient buildings is to physically protect both the property and the people, resiliency can also have positive <em>mental</em> health effects for building occupants. Knowing that increased stress levels <a href="http://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lancet/PIIS0140-6736(15)60854-6.pdf" target="_blank">have been found to directly cause greater psychological issues</a> including suicide, domestic abuse, and other destructive behaviors, my colleague, David Cordell, and I set out to explore how the interior environment could actually reduce mental distress.</p> <p>Stress occurs before, during, and after a crisis event. Factors outside of a building can contribute to stress as much as the interior environment. Inability to communicate with loved ones will certainly cause anguish for a family member.  Lack of access to potable water and food have physical impacts but can also cause mental strain.  While building occupants may not always have much advance notice of an acute event (such as an earthquake or tornado), there are ways the design of a space can impact the mental health of the occupants in those before, during, and after timeframes.  Knowing an event will occur in the near future (such as a predicted hurricane) may allow physical preparations to occur, but having that advance notice may actually increase stress levels as one awaits the storm.</p> <p>Our research project, <a href="http://perkinswill.com/research/weathering-storm-mental-health-and-resilient-design" target="_blank">Weathering the Storm: Mental Health and Resilient Design</a>, proposed links between specific design strategies and the positive psychological benefits they may provide when building occupants are faced with a crisis event.  Several studies have already shown <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447992/" target="_blank">direct access to nature and natural elements relieves stress</a>. Installing a green roof on a building provides a number of sustainability benefits—stormwater management, creation of wildlife habitat, decreased urban heat island effect—but such an area can also ease depression and reduce stress levels if available as an outdoor refuge to building occupants who may need to shelter-in-place.  Green roofs can also be used to cultivate fruits and vegetables, offering both nutrition and mental reassurance.</p> <p>Other strategies for resilience planning involve design elements coupled with operations policy.  A building may choose to provide alternate transportation options to occupants for use in times of stress.  In a flood-prone area, inflatable rafts and air pumps stored on a floor above the projected flood plain may offer a way home (and access to loved ones) during extreme precipitation or storm surges. It also offers a way to retrieve supplies for occupants sheltering during such an event.</p> <p>Communication of these measures to occupants is also an important factor for reducing stress.  Occupants need to know what safeguards the building has in place and be comfortable employing them.  When these and other strategies are communicated to building occupants, we believe there may be a lessening of anticipatory stress as people know there are means in place to help them during a crisis event.</p> <p>Why do we care? What is the true benefit? Mental health is a major factor in quality of life, and improving it may lead to greater workforce productivity and reduced absenteeism.  Certain design strategies can promote a greater sense of community connectivity.  Employers may see reduced insurance costs related to psychological issues during and after crisis events.  Residual or delayed stress—that which stays with individuals long after an event has occurred (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, for example)—may even be staved off or lessened when occupants’ mental health is factored into planning for resilience to crisis.</p> <p>By making our spaces more resilient and communicating that value to tenants, designers can contribute to the improved mental wellbeing of occupants. Protecting against loss of life and property is important, but it should not be the only factor in meeting site-specific vulnerabilities. As we increase awareness of design’s impact, occupants may even begin to seek out buildings that can flex with climate fluctuations. Who knows—we may see resilient design joining the ranks of roof decks and bike rooms as the hot new tenant amenity.</p> <p><strong>About the Author: </strong>Jon Penndorf is a project manager and sustainability leader in Perkins+Will’s Washington, DC office. He is involved in the management and design of a variety of project types, from focused interior renovations to energy management across a full real estate portfolio. Jon is a recipient of the AIA’s Young Architect Award, the 2012 president of the AIA’s DC chapter, and the 2014 chair of the AIA’s Young Architects Forum advisory committee. With over 12 years of professional experience, Jon is engaged in many areas of the architecture community including community leadership, writing, and education.</p> </div> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 15:36:10 +0000 mchamernik 37681 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com ASTM International updates seismic risk standards http://www.bdcnetwork.com/astm-international-updates-seismic-risk-standards <span>ASTM International updates seismic risk standards </span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mchamernik" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mchamernik</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/28/2016 - 10:12</span> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Expected to improve consistency of risk evaluation on commercial real estate transactions.</p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Peter Fabris, Contributing Editor</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/11824669333_70f2c9e061_o.jpg" width="1000" height="560" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Expected to improve consistency of risk evaluation on commercial real estate transactions.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/resources/codes-and-standards" hreflang="en">Codes and Standards</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>ASTM International recently released changes to E2026 Standard Guide and E2557 Standard Practice, industry standards for <a href="http://www.globest.com/sites/partnerESI/2016/06/09/astm-updates-standards-for-assessing-building-seismic-risk/" target="_blank">assessing seismic risk to buildings</a>.  </p> <p>The changes are expected to improve the consistency of the evaluation of seismic risks for commercial real estate transactions. Among the changes are:</p> <ul><li>New definitions</li> <li>Better defined criteria for consultant qualifications for performing the work</li> <li>Requirement for more detailed calculations</li> <li>Review of plans and analysis of site seismicity for higher level assessments</li> </ul><p>The biggest impact to commercial real estate due diligence pertains to changes in consultant qualification criteria. The revised standard requires that a consultant performing the analysis must be a licensed civil or structural engineer with at least 10 years of general structural engineering, at least 5 years of experience in seismic design and analysis of buildings, and at least 3 years of seismic risk assessment of buildings.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/astm-international-updates-seismic-risk-standards" data-a2a-title="ASTM International updates seismic risk standards "><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Fastm-international-updates-seismic-risk-standards&amp;title=ASTM%20International%20updates%20seismic%20risk%20standards%20"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Tue, 28 Jun 2016 15:12:46 +0000 mchamernik 37571 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Carbon fiber strings make Japanese office building earthquake resistant http://www.bdcnetwork.com/carbon-fiber-strings-make-japanese-office-building-earthquake-resistant <span>Carbon fiber strings make Japanese office building earthquake resistant</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mchamernik" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mchamernik</span></span> <span>Wed, 04/20/2016 - 14:43</span> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Kengo Kuma developed the rods, which are stronger and lighter than iron.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Mike Chamernik, Associate Editor</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/Screen%20Shot%202016-04-21%20at%2011.22.52%20AM.png" width="943" height="498" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Kengo Kuma developed the rods, which are stronger and lighter than iron.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Ishikawa, Japan, has experienced eight earthquakes over the past year. The constant rumblings have building owners seeking unconventional solutions.</p> <p>Japanese architect Kengo Kuma found one for the former head office of fabric manufacturer Komatsu Seiren. The three-story building has been covered with <a href="http://www.komatsuseiren.co.jp/cabkoma/en/" target="_blank">Cabkoma Strand Rods</a>, which are 9 mm-wide strings made of a thermoplastic carbon fiber composite.</p> <p><a href="http://www.engadget.com/2016/04/13/carbon-fiber-strings-protect-against-earthquakes/" target="_blank">As Endgadget explains</a>, the rods make it appear that spiderwebs completely surround the building. The rods are tied to the roof and anchored to the ground, ensuring that when an earthquake hits, the entire structure will sway together and not crumble.</p> <p>According to Kengo Kuma, the strings are seven times stronger than iron wires, but only a fraction of the weight. A 160-meter-long coil weighs just 26 lbs.</p> <p> </p> <p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="393" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SIorJpr784o" width="700"></iframe></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/carbon-fiber-strings-make-japanese-office-building-earthquake-resistant" data-a2a-title="Carbon fiber strings make Japanese office building earthquake resistant"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Fcarbon-fiber-strings-make-japanese-office-building-earthquake-resistant&amp;title=Carbon%20fiber%20strings%20make%20Japanese%20office%20building%20earthquake%20resistant"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Wed, 20 Apr 2016 19:43:02 +0000 mchamernik 36011 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com SOM’s Salt Lake City skyscraper uses innovative structural system to suspend itself over a neighboring building http://www.bdcnetwork.com/soms-salt-lake-city-skyscraper-uses-innovative-structural-system-suspend-itself-over-neighboring <span>SOM’s Salt Lake City skyscraper uses innovative structural system to suspend itself over a neighboring building</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/dmalone" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dmalone</span></span> <span>Mon, 03/28/2016 - 15:59</span> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-sector-reports/high-rise-construction" hreflang="en">High-rise Construction</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>The hat truss-supported office tower was topped off in January, rising 25 stories above the Salt Lake City streets.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>BD+C Editors</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/street-view.jpg" width="850" height="650" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>The hat truss-supported office tower was topped off in January, rising 25 stories above the Salt Lake City streets.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/concrete" hreflang="en">Concrete</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/concrete/concrete-technology" hreflang="en">Concrete Technology</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-sector-reports/high-rise-construction" hreflang="en">High-rise Construction</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/structural-materials/steel-construction" hreflang="en">Steel Construction</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/products-and-materials/structural-materials" hreflang="en">Structural Materials</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Located in the heart of downtown Salt Lake City, 111 Main is the freshest face on the Crossroads of the West’s skyline. The building, whose roof hat truss structure was just topped off in January, transferred its loads from a temporary shoring support system to the permanent structural system during a 12-hour period.</p> <p>The building’s architect and structural engineer, Skidmore Owings &amp; Merrill, had to find a solution to a complex problem brought on by the building site's location: how to suspend a portion of the building over an adjacent structure.</p> <p>111 Main is on a contiguous parcel with the new Salt Lake County Center for the Arts’ George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Theater, which overlaps on the lower four stories and basement level of the tower footprint. To accommodate the Eccles Theater under the southern portion of 111 Main’s tower, a structural system was required that did not extend columns below the fifth level of the tower on the south side.</p> <p>SOM designed the penthouse roof level of the 387-foot-tall building to be comprised of a balanced two-way steel hat truss system that supports the office tower’s 18 perimeter columns in an integrated load-balanced structure. The central reinforced concrete core walls provide the only connection of the tower to its foundation and resist all gravity loads, as well as wind and seismic vertical and lateral loads. In fact, 111 Main was designed and built to withstand a 2,500-year earthquake event.</p> <p> </p> <p><img alt="" src="https://bdcnetwork.s3.amazonaws.com/s3fs-public/body-images/111main_680x510_city_creek_reserve_incleft_somright.jpg" style="width: 680px; height: 510px;" /><em>Photo: City Creek Reserve, Inc.; Rendering: SOM</em> </p> <p> </p> <p>Conventional long-span, composite-steel floor framing construction connects the central core walls to the perimeter steel frame and suspended columns, providing open office spaces free of interior columns and a completely column-free lobby at the tower’s base.</p> <p>111 Main is looking to achieve LEED Gold certification by using less energy and water and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Building operation is targeted to operate 15% below Utah’s energy codes and will utilize fully automated, under-floor energy conserving HVAC systems with 16-inch raised floors.</p> <p>The aforementioned lobby will consist of 35-foot-tall clear glass and span 5,876 sf. Overall, there will be approximately 440,000 sf available to rent.</p> <p>Because of the unique hat truss structural system that allows for a column-free floor design throughout, the use of floor-to-ceiling glass offices stands out even more. One of the more unique amenities is the building lobby’s connection to the Eccles Theater Grand Lobby, the building that 111 Main hovers over and fits with like a Tetris piece.</p> <p>A combination of five low-rise elevators, four high-rise elevators, and one freight elevator will be used to get people where they need to go within the structure. 111 Main will feature state-of-the-art fiber infrastructure, redundant data feeds, and electricity sourced from two substations.</p> <p>Joining SOM on the Building Team is Oakland Construction (GC) and City Creek Reserve (Developer).</p> <p>The anticipated completion date for 111 Main is August 2016.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/soms-salt-lake-city-skyscraper-uses-innovative-structural-system-suspend-itself-over-neighboring" data-a2a-title="SOM’s Salt Lake City skyscraper uses innovative structural system to suspend itself over a neighboring building"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Fsoms-salt-lake-city-skyscraper-uses-innovative-structural-system-suspend-itself-over-neighboring&amp;title=SOM%E2%80%99s%20Salt%20Lake%20City%20skyscraper%20uses%20innovative%20structural%20system%20to%20suspend%20itself%20over%20a%20neighboring%20building"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Mon, 28 Mar 2016 20:59:39 +0000 dmalone 35511 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Fire Resistive Curtain Wall Helps Hospital Meet Fire and Seismic Requirements http://www.bdcnetwork.com/fire-resistive-curtain-wall-helps-hospital-meet-fire-and-seismic-requirements <span>Fire Resistive Curtain Wall Helps Hospital Meet Fire and Seismic Requirements</span> <div class="uk-margin">1</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/dmalone" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dmalone</span></span> <span>Mon, 03/07/2016 - 09:33</span> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/fire-rated-products" hreflang="en">Fire-Rated Products</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>SaftiFirst’s custom curtain wall complied with all the seismic requirements while still blending in seamlessly with building’s design</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>SaftiFirst</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/SJ-Downtown-Health.jpg" width="600" height="400" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>SaftiFirst’s custom curtain wall complied with all the seismic requirements while still blending in seamlessly with building’s design</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/fire-rated-products" hreflang="en">Fire-Rated Products</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/seismic-design" hreflang="en">Seismic Design</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p><em>Project Name: San Jose Downtown Health Center in San Jose, CA<br /> Architect: </em><a href="http://www.ratcliffarch.com/"><em>Ratcliff</em></a><br /><em>General Contractor: </em><a href="http://www.flintbuilders.com/"><em>Flint Builders</em></a><br /><em>Glazing Contractor: Montez Glass<br /> Products:  SuperLite II-XL 60 insulated with Solarban 70XL in GPX Curtain Wall Framing (exterior); SuperLite II-XL 60 in GPX Architectural Series Walls and GPX Builders Series Temperature Rise Doors (interior) </em></p> <p><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">California has a long history of experiencing major, catastrophic earthquakes, and is predicted to experience more in the future.  According to the Office of Statewide Health and Planning’s (OSHPD) report on </span><a href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=2&amp;cad=rja&amp;uact=8&amp;ved=0ahUKEwjJm_HawaLLAhVD6CYKHasrCE4QFggkMAE&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.oshpd.ca.gov%2Ffdd%2Fseismic_compliance%2FSB1953%2FSeismicReport.pdf&amp;usg=AFQjCNGMks_QrGOMYYN0sVrHIgV09UJzIA" style="line-height: 1.6em;" target="_blank">California’s Hospital Seismic Safety Law</a><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">, a moderately strong earthquake (6.0 to 6.9 magnitude) occurs in the state every two to three years.  Since it is not a question of “if” but rather “when” the next major earthquake will occur, California now has stricter seismic requirements in the building code, with special requirements for critical facilities that need extra protection.</span></p> <p>In 1973, the legislature passed the Alfred E. Alquist Hospital Seismic Safety Act, which required acute care hospitals to be designed and constructed to withstand a major earthquake and remain operational immediately after.  However, the 1994 Northridge earthquake (with a 6.7 magnitude) revealed that many hospital buildings performed poorly. This led to the passage of <a href="http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/FDD/seismic_compliance/SB1953/index.html" target="_blank">Senate Bill (SB) 1953</a>, which amended the Alquist Act to require hospitals to evaluate their general acute care building for seismic resistance based on the standards set by OSHPD. </p> <p>How have some hospitals complied with SB 1953?  In 2008, Santa Clara Country proposed Measure A, which would allocate $50M towards funding a new facility to replace the old San Jose Medical Center that was shut down in 2004 due to rising operational costs and a mandated seismic retrofit, which would have cost hundreds of millions of dollars.  Measure A passed without opposition in 2012, and groundbreaking on the construction of a modern, seismically fit San Jose Downtown Health Center began soon after. </p> <p>Ratcliff was chosen as the architect to design the new three-story, 60,000 square foot facility that includes urgent care for adults and children, primary care for pediatric, OB/GYN and family medicine, behavioral health services, laboratory, pharmacy and radiology departments. Their design takes advantage of glazing’s ability to draw natural light from the outdoors to achieve LEED Gold Certification. The abundance of natural light also creates a warm, pleasing atmosphere that promotes healing and reduces anxieties often associated with medical visits. </p> <p>Part of the hospital’s exterior curtain wall had to be fire rated for one hour.  To keep the transparent look, the architects specified a one hour fire resistive curtain wall with <a href="http://safti.com/product/superlite-ii-xl-60/" target="_blank">SuperLite II-XL 60</a> insulated with Solarban 70XL in <a href="http://safti.com/gpx-curtain-wall/" target="_blank">GPX Curtain Wall</a> framing to meet the design, energy and fire requirements.  The fire resistive curtain wall was supplied with custom extrusions to match the system depth and finish of the adjacent non-rated curtain wall for a uniform, seamless look. </p> <p>To comply with seismic requirements, the engineers at SAFTI FIRST worked with the building team to provide a custom fire resistive curtain wall system that allowed for deflection and story-drift movement specifically designed to work in concert with the adjacent non-rated curtain wall.  This was to ensure that in the event of an earthquake, both systems would work together and remain intact, thus allowing the hospital to remain fully functional.  </p> <p>Another concern was providing safe paths of egress in case the earthquake triggers a fire in the hospital.  One hour rated egress stairways are on both sides of the building.  To keep the light-filled transparent look throughout the building, the architects used SuperLite II-XL 60 in <a href="http://safti.com/gpx-architectural-series/" target="_blank">GPX Architectural Series Framing</a>.  For maximum vision, the architects also used SuperLite II-XL 60 in <a href="http://safti.com/gpx-builders-series-temperature-rise/" target="_blank">GPX Builders Series Temperature Rise Door</a> Framing in order to exceed the otherwise 100 sq. in. code limitation imposed on fire protective glass (such as wired glass, ceramics, etc.). in the door vision panels.  This fire resistive door and wall assembly gives one-hour of full protection from smoke, flames and radiant heat, which allows patients and staff to exit safety or provide a safe haven as they await rescue.</p> <p><img alt="" src="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/files/SaftiMainImage_0.png" style="line-height: 20.8px; opacity: 0.9; width: 600px;" /></p> <p>The result is a beautiful, modern health center that will bring much needed services to the community for many years to come.  The new San Jose Downtown Health Center is scheduled to open its doors to the public in 2016.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/fire-resistive-curtain-wall-helps-hospital-meet-fire-and-seismic-requirements" data-a2a-title="Fire Resistive Curtain Wall Helps Hospital Meet Fire and Seismic Requirements"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Ffire-resistive-curtain-wall-helps-hospital-meet-fire-and-seismic-requirements&amp;title=Fire%20Resistive%20Curtain%20Wall%20Helps%20Hospital%20Meet%20Fire%20and%20Seismic%20Requirements"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:33:38 +0000 dmalone 35086 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com