Energy Efficiency http://www.bdcnetwork.com/ en Gainesville, Fla., ordinance requires Home Energy Score during rental inspections http://www.bdcnetwork.com/gainesville-fla-ordinance-requires-home-energy-score-during-rental-inspections <span>Gainesville, Fla., ordinance requires Home Energy Score during rental inspections</span> <div class="uk-margin">0</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mcrumbley" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mcrumbley</span></span> <span>Thu, 09/22/2022 - 09:03</span> <div class="uk-margin"><p>The city of Gainesville, Florida was recently recognized by the U.S. Dept. of Energy for an adopted ordinance that requires rental housing to receive a Home Energy Score during rental inspections.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Peter Fabris, Contributing Editor</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/Code%20Inspection%20Construction.jpg" width="1800" height="1200" alt="Code Inspection Construction" title="Code Inspection Construction" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>First U.S. city to require landlords to obtain score and share it with tenants.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team" hreflang="en">Building Team</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/contractors" hreflang="en">Contractors</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers" hreflang="en">Designers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers-specifiers-landscape-architects" hreflang="en">Designers / Specifiers / Landscape Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/engineers" hreflang="en">Engineers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/facility-managers" hreflang="en">Facility Managers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/architects" hreflang="en">Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency" hreflang="en">Energy Efficiency</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency/energy-efficient-design" hreflang="en">Energy-Efficient Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/resources/codes-and-standards" hreflang="en">Codes and Standards</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/codes-and-standards/codes" hreflang="en">Codes</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/codes-and-standards/legislation" hreflang="en">Legislation</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/codes-and-standards/regulations" hreflang="en">Regulations</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/codes-and-standards/standards" hreflang="en">Standards</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>The city of Gainesville, Florida was recently recognized by the U.S. Dept. of Energy for an adopted ordinance that requires rental housing to receive a Home Energy Score during rental inspections.</p> <p>The ordinance, believed to be the first of its kind in the U.S., applies to all rental units including quadruplexes and smaller properties. The city’s permit and inspection program aims to raise minimum energy efficiency, safety, and property maintenance standards for regulated residential rental units.</p> <p>The Home Energy Score is a numerical rating from one to 10 that helps homeowners, buyers, and tenants understand how energy-efficient a home or rental unit is and how it compares to other units. The score is based on a unit’s envelope—roof, foundation, walls, insulation, and windows, and its energy systems—heating, cooling, and hot water. The higher the score, the higher a unit’s energy efficiency.</p> <p>As a DOE 2022 Annual Partner Innovation Award program partner, Gainesville is required to inspect a minimum of 500 homes per year. More than 440 rental units have been scored to date.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/gainesville-fla-ordinance-requires-home-energy-score-during-rental-inspections" data-a2a-title="Gainesville, Fla., ordinance requires Home Energy Score during rental inspections"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Fgainesville-fla-ordinance-requires-home-energy-score-during-rental-inspections&amp;title=Gainesville%2C%20Fla.%2C%20ordinance%20requires%20Home%20Energy%20Score%20during%20rental%20inspections"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Thu, 22 Sep 2022 14:03:13 +0000 mcrumbley 50373 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Use of GBCI building performance tools rapidly expanding http://www.bdcnetwork.com/use-gbci-building-performance-tools-rapidly-expanding <span>Use of GBCI building performance tools rapidly expanding</span> <div class="uk-margin">0</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mcrumbley" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mcrumbley</span></span> <span>Wed, 09/07/2022 - 09:06</span> <div class="uk-margin"><p>More than seven billion square feet of project space is now being tracked using Green Business Certification Inc.’s (GBCI’s) Arc performance platform.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Peter Fabris, Contributing Editor</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/GBCI%20Performance.jpg" width="1800" height="1350" alt="GBCI Performance" title="GBCI Performance" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>More than 7 billion square feet of project space using sustainability tracking software.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/contractors" hreflang="en">Contractors</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers" hreflang="en">Designers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers-specifiers-landscape-architects" hreflang="en">Designers / Specifiers / Landscape Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/engineers" hreflang="en">Engineers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/facility-managers" hreflang="en">Facility Managers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/architects" hreflang="en">Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency" hreflang="en">Energy Efficiency</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency/energy-efficient-design" hreflang="en">Energy-Efficient Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/sustainability" hreflang="en">Sustainability</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>More than seven billion square feet of project space is now being tracked using <a href="https://www.gbci.org/" target="_blank">Green Business Certification Inc.’s (GBCI’s)</a> Arc performance platform.</p> <p>Arc users are measuring performance of project space in nearly 140 countries, according to a GBCI news release. The amount of space being tracked increased by 1.4 billion sf over the last 12 months.</p> <p>Arc’s tools allow users to measure, track, and score the real-world sustainability performance of spaces, buildings, and places. They include scores and metrics for five performance categories: energy, water, waste, transportation, and human experience. The information provides insights about sustainability, helping teams assess readiness for LEED certification.</p> <p>“Reaching seven billion square feet of space using Arc is a significant milestone,” said Peter Templeton, interim president and CEO, GBCI and Arc. “This underscores the rapidly growing commitment of building owners and operators worldwide to tracking, reporting, and verifying performance as critical steps towards minimizing climate change impacts, improving occupant and community health, and increasing energy security and resilience.”</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/use-gbci-building-performance-tools-rapidly-expanding" data-a2a-title="Use of GBCI building performance tools rapidly expanding"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Fuse-gbci-building-performance-tools-rapidly-expanding&amp;title=Use%20of%20GBCI%20building%20performance%20tools%20rapidly%20expanding"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Wed, 07 Sep 2022 14:06:31 +0000 mcrumbley 50318 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Solutions for cladding performance and supply issues http://www.bdcnetwork.com/course/solutions-cladding-performance-and-supply-issues <span>Solutions for cladding performance and supply issues</span> <div class="uk-margin"><p>C.C. Sullivan, Contributing Editor</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/dbarista" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">dbarista</span></span> <span>Wed, 08/24/2022 - 13:08</span> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/2022-08/Solutions%20for%20cladding%20performance%20and%20supply%20issues%20AIA%20course.jpg" width="1800" height="1470" alt="Solutions for cladding performance and supply issues AIA course" title="Solutions for cladding performance and supply issues AIA course" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>This course covers design considerations and cladding assembly choices for creating high-performance building envelopes — a crucial element in healthy, energy-efficient buildings.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>From a distance, today’s building innovations in cladding performance, aesthetics, and construction appear unconstrained and quite varied. Material mixing is creating newly expressive façades, and performance standards for solar heating, air infiltration, and moisture management are more effective than ever before. Increased use of rainscreens and new fabrication innovations, including engineered precast systems, contribute to surprising new enclosure designs backed by better solutions to ensure <a href="https://www.polyiso.org/page/ContinuousInsulation" target="_blank">continuous insulation (CI)</a> and properly installed and structurally supported air barriers.</p> <p>Technically, today’s building teams are producing passive designs and sustainable solutions that are more effective than ever, often with renewable materials that better withstand climate stressors while committing less embodied carbon.</p> <p>It sounds good. Yet, just as this is happening, building teams are facing unprecedented price pressures and supply chain issues that necessitate rapid, creative solutions. Where value engineering has been a dominant solution path of last resort in past decades, post-pandemic cladding selection is all about making do with less, anticipating shortages, and collaborating on clever downstream substitutions.</p> <p><img alt="1082022 AIA course cladding image" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="bdfb65d0-d3f9-4530-a059-baccba4e6002" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/1082022%20AIA%20course%20cladding%20image.jpg" width="439" height="209" loading="lazy" /></p> <p>First, managing project costs is a dynamic, ongoing battle. Construction materials jumped over 20% on average from 2021 to 2022, according to Associated General Contractors (AGC) of America, which <a href="https://www.agc.org/news/2022/03/15/materials-prices-nonresidential-construction-soar-21-percent-february-2021-february-2022-association" target="_blank">reported</a> that “multiple increases have taken effect for metals, fuel, and trucking, while supply chains have become even more snarled.” Examples of base products commonly used in cladding systems include copper (24.4% YOY cost increase), architectural coatings (20.3%), insulation materials (17.8%), and plywood sheathing and exterior siding products more generally, both at 22.5%. Behind the double-digit price increases are challenges for many material suppliers, including reduced availability and price hikes for energy and fuels, constituent materials, and freight itself. “At some point, projects no longer pencil out as contractors have to raise bid prices to keep pace with the rapid inflation in materials costs,” said Stephen E. Sandherr, CEO of AGC.</p> <h2>Cladding supply chain solutions</h2> <p>The initial response has been chaos for cladding specifiers and subcontractors alike. Owners and developers have postponed project starts to match exterior system delivery timeframes. Construction management (CM) firms have devised inventive project staging and sequencing to realign preconstruction activities or speed up certain trades while cladding deliveries catch up, <a href="https://www.constructionnews.co.uk/supply-chain/cladding-material-delays-threaten-construction-programmes-16-06-2021/" target="_blank">according to global developer McLaren</a>. Other project teams report using a stop-start approach on multiple project sites, both priming the project pipeline while also staging strategically for pending cladding product deliveries.</p> <p>During the pandemic, owner-operators with ambitious building programs like hotel company citizenM have stocked up on modular construction systems with integrated façade assemblies, completing new hotels in Los Angeles and Seattle recently, among others. Using a <a href="https://www.citizenm.com/company/centralised-business-model" target="_blank">centralized business model</a>, the global company created a backlog of the interchangeable and deployable, stackable units within structural steel cages. According to the CM Mortenson, which has built several of the hotels with architects Concrete, Baskervill, and Gensler, as well as engineers like Arup, integrating the “modern and luxurious modular room pods” into the building designs also slashes construction waste by up to 60% says Mortenson’s Director Of Project Development, Nathan Jenkins. He says the approach cuts construction duration by three to four months, compared to traditional onsite methods.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="2B. 1700-Pavilion_facade" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="d23c72a9-7376-42c7-8dcd-dec15fd75eef" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/2B.%201700-Pavilion_facade.jpg" width="1200" height="959" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>An innovative, light-colored cladding of preglazed, preinsulated GFRC panels clads 1700 Pavilion in Summerlin, Nev., accelerating construction for the lifestyle-driven commercial building. Photo: Howard Hughes Corp.</figcaption></figure><p>On the supply end, some façade system manufacturers resist bidding on projects unless they’ve received iron-clad purchase orders. Others, according to Capstone, a financing company active in the construction sector, use price collars or put “<a href="https://capstonetrade.com/tips-on-bidding-new-projects-in-an-inflationary-environment/" target="_blank">expiration dates</a>” on bids so they “have the opportunity to rebid if the bid validity date passes to account for the higher cost of goods.” Another option that has been rare in the past, stipulating inflation terms in contract language, can benefit general contractors and at-risk CMs, as well as the suppliers involved. “Construction cost inflation has not exceeded 5% for over three decades, so many contractors do not have experience in an inflationary environment,” according to Capstone. “Adding a few percentage points to bids for inflation won’t protect you sufficiently in this type of environment either.”</p> <h2>Stockpiling and speeding envelopes</h2> <p>Building teams with multiple projects or major capital programs are stockpiling materials they use frequently or are making “ghost orders” not necessarily related to a particular project. Suffolk Construction has successfully warehoused materials recently to keep projects on schedule, while other contractors are reporting related shortages of storage facilities, leading the teams to erect temporary laydown facilities. Taking a proactive posture has helped contractor XL Construction, which self-performs some of its work, to deal with <a href="https://www.constructiondive.com/news/hoarding-ghost-orders-and-pop-up-warehouses-constructions-new-supply-cha/619131/" target="_blank">reported lead times of up to a year for curtain wall systems and precast wall cladding</a>.</p> <p>Building design teams are regrouping and looking for more readily available materials. While fiberglass resin shortages slowed swimming pool construction last year, sales of glass-fiber-reinforced concrete (GFRC) grew, boosting architectural precast suppliers like Willis Construction. Projects under way include <a href="https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-howard-hughes-corporation-breaks-ground-on-new-class-a-office-building-and-phase-two-of-multi-family-complex-in-downtown-summerlin-301309719.html" target="_blank">1700 Pavilion</a> in downtown Summerlin, Nev., a Howard Hughes Corp. office building to open this fall. Designed by architect Hart Howerton and being built by GC Whiting Turner, the building features an innovative, light-colored cladding of preglazed and preinsulated GFRC panels.</p> <p>The lightweight cladding panels minimize structural loads, which can hasten framing and connection deliveries, and they can be “prefabricated in advance while the foundation and structure are being built,” <a href="https://www.strombergarchitectural.com/technical/gfrc-cladding-panels.pdf" target="_blank">according to another GFRC maker, Stromberg Architectural</a>. “Cladding with GFRC panels can often eliminate the need for scaffolding because the panels are lifted by crane and then attached from inside the building,” regardless of weather, adds the Texas-based supplier.</p> <p>Craned applications hold wide appeal in this tight market, according to owner-developers like nonprofit senior community Harbor’s Edge in Norfolk, Va. Their project team—including contractor W.M. Jordan and architecture firms three and Clark Nexen—responded to developer and CEO Neil Volder’s conception of a 24-story high-rise expansion, River Tower, with an exterior façade system melding brick, masonry, and glass that could be erected quickly and with a crane, rather than system scaffolding. Local precast manufacturer Smith-Midland produced the SlenderWall composite cladding panels offsite in <a href="https://smithmidland.com/blog/2019/07/09/w-m-jordan-company-and-clark-nexsen-choose-slenderwall-again/" target="_blank">two-story sections with windows preinstalled</a>, says Carl S. Ede, AIA, LEED AP, Principal and Senior Designer with three, the Dallas-based firm. About 66% lighter than traditional 6-inch-thick precast and with better thermal performance, the opaque wall sections integrate a two-inch-thick concrete panel on a frame of galvanized steel studs backed with closed-cell foam insulation. Less concrete means lower embodied carbon, too, say suppliers.</p> <p>Attached to the building frame with all-concrete floor slabs—a better choice acoustically between floors to mask footfall and other noise, says three’s Ede—the mixed-material system with brick, masonry, and glass allows for articulated transitions such as banding across glass areas that echoes Norfolk’s portside context, yet can be hoisted into place quickly in two-floor sections. The only tradeoff is crane access and operations, he adds, which building teams must consider in site staging and construction decisions.</p> <h2>How to master rainscreens</h2> <p>For another high-rise, a new 35-story glass tower in Boston for Raffles set to open this year, the use of small, portable crawler or creeper cranes allows smooth construction progress in spite of a constrained urban site. Built with a carefully tuned, unitized glass curtain wall system specifically to allow this fast, effective assembly process with the moveable cranes hanging off the structure, the Back Bay-area project for Raffles Hotels &amp; Resorts, part of AccorHotels, brings together Saunders Hotel Group and <a href="https://www.noannet.com/projects/raffles-boston-back-bay-hotel-residences/" target="_blank">developer The Noannet Group</a> for the U.S. debut of the brand’s hotel and residential concept. The building team of Suffolk Construction and The Architectural Team, along with structural engineers McNamara Salvia, resolved the tower’s cantilever structure atop a dense field of six-foot-wide caissons tied by steel plate girders, all supporting the tower with 147 guestrooms and 146 residences serviced by a program of extensive amenities.</p> <p>The new Boston tower, adjacent to the city’s most iconic tall structures, melds varied glass specifications in response to its multiple uses and performance goals for a unique expression. Other project cladding approaches, by contrast, mix materials and construction types for not only aesthetics but also to help deal with cost inflation, supply issues, and construction scheduling.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="3A. ACAW-Images_2-2306x1164" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="618e73bb-9913-43cc-a9ed-9086a8cdd7e3" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/3A.%20ACAW-Images_2-2306x1164.jpg" width="1800" height="909" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>A modular terra-cotta façade system serves as habitat for birds, bees, and plantings, made with a base module designed to resist freeze-thaw cycles. Photo courtesy CookFox</figcaption></figure><p>Among the most prevalent trends is an expanding use of rainscreens, <a href="https://rainscreenassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Press-Release-The-North-American-Construction-industry-benefits-from-the-newly-formed-Rainscreen-Association-RAiNA.pdf" target="_blank">says the Rainscreen Association in North America</a>, founded in 2020. “Over the last two decades, the building science community has pushed exterior wall assembly performance to the front of the conversation regarding overall building performance,” according to the trade group and technical resource, which <a href="https://rainscreenassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/D-188-001-rev-0-RAiNA-Technical-Bulletin-Defining-Rainscreen-Wall-Performance-1.pdf" target="_blank">defines a rainscreen</a> as “an assembly applied to an exterior wall that consists of, at minimum, an outer/inner layer and a cavity between them sufficient for the passive removal of liquid water and water vapor.” Rainscreen systems also incorporate insulation, continuous air barriers for air-tightness control, and vapor barriers or retarders for diffusion control, “a balance of wetting versus drying for the whole assembly.”</p> <p>With constrained supplies for some components, building teams are turning to rainscreen outer layers made with readily available composites of stone, wood fiber, or plastics—many of them drawing from waste streams. Examples include composite panels such as Fiberon, a substitute for thermally modified timbers or other wood panels that might be harder to source in some areas. The composite is made from locally sourced recycled plastic and captured waste wood fiber, specifying approximately 94% pre- and post-consumer recycled content. In 2021, makers of building products had been facing material shortages for certain plastics and resins, though raw material makers pushed to increase production, <a href="https://www.plasticsnews.com/news/decking-makers-step-production" target="_blank">according to plastics industry sources</a>.</p> <p>Similarly, other rainscreen cladding products such as stone composites have been in good supply. These engineered materials include panels made from fiberglass-reinforced polymer composites with a crushed limestone core, for example, and some are treated with electron-beam or EB technology and acrylic resins to produce a range of smooth, water-impermeable finishes that stand up to ultraviolet and corrosive environments. One Norwegian manufacturer, Steni, produces a line of stone composite panels with a surface of aggregated natural stones. Produced in different grades of coarseness, carefully calibrated composites of this type have a relatively low <a href="https://www.steni.com/products/product-properties/" target="_blank">carbon footprint</a> and are highly stable, resisting impact and water and vapor diffusion—basically, moisture-proof. Also of interest to designers, stone-based façade panels are flexible and so can be curved and radiused for organic building shapes.</p> <p>Strength and resiliency is a benefit of the wood-look plastic composites as well, offering “high flexural strength, which translates to maximum protection in severe weather conditions,” according to Peter Kotiadis, VP of Product Development at Fiberon. The material class is considered effective for open-joint rainscreens, which require not only highly durable materials, but also carefully detailed envelope installation.</p> <p>For the ventilation gap, for example, “Smaller spaces behind the cladding outperform larger spaces because the pressure equalization is more equal between the face of the cladding and the open joint behind the cladding in a smaller space behind the cladding than a larger space behind the cladding,” <a href="https://www.buildingscience.com/conversation/cup-joe-open-joint-cladding-systems" target="_blank">according to Joe Lstiburek</a>, an ASHRAE Fellow and Principal of Building Science Corporation.</p> <h2>Terra-cotta and cladding tech</h2> <p>With proper material choice is critical, cladding systems including rainscreens can effectively manage moisture and mitigate damage to residential and commercial structures. They also open up opportunities for more sustainable and biophilic façades. These include ways to create or extend ecosystems into the built environment, a trend that has gone from landscapes to planted roofs to other interfaces between the outside world and interior environments. Researchers led by the Museum of Natural History in Paris, for example, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2351989414000869#!" target="_blank">studied the ecological drivers of vegetated façades</a> and found they “offer a great potential to enhance urban biodiversity.”</p> <p>Beyond the cladding systems considered in that study—those with climbing plants, felt layers, or substrate modules such as suspended planters—new ideas in habitat are growing with unlikely materials, such as the terra-cotta collaboration led by Spencer Lapp, AIA, an Associate with CookFox, and Andre Parnther and Spring Wu, LEED AP, respectively, an Associate and a Façade Engineer with Buro Happold, and <a href="https://bostonvalley.com/buro-happold-and-cookfox-explore-biophilic-facades-at-acaw-2021/" target="_blank">manufacturer Boston Valley Terra Cotta</a>. The team devised a “modular system of slip-cast pods,” says the company, adding: “Each module is shaped to occupy a specific function in the local ecosystem: as bird nests, with proper air flow and drainage; as bee habitats, protected from the elements; and as planters, with a bottom-watering system and overflow drain.”</p> <p>The larger base modules—made with a high-fired and high-grogged ceramic that could also be press-molded for large-scale production—receive micro-habitat pots for varied uses. “This clay body is engineered to resist freeze thaw cycles, minimize shrinkage during fabrication, and is tested for the rigors inherent in façade applications,” <a href="https://cookfox.com/news/cookfox-and-buro-happold-acaw/" target="_blank">according to the building team</a>. “The micro-habitat pods are a slip-cast, low-fired clay body that allows for water permeability to support each pod’s program.” Custom glazes and pigmented clays called <a href="https://digitalfire.com/article/creating+a+non-glaze+ceramic+slip+or+engobe" target="_blank"><em>engobes</em></a> created for this cladding system offer a variety of colors, sheens, and opacities for future project teams.</p> <p>Not surprisingly, both CookFox and Buro Happold have prior experience working with terra-cotta for urban façades, which has seen a resurgence in recent years in multifamily, mixed-use, cultural, and institutional projects. Examples by others include the new One Essex Crossing, the residential component of a major, <a href="https://americas.uli.org/essex-crossing-2021-uli-americas-awards-for-excellence-finalist/" target="_blank">six-acre mixed-use development in New York City</a> focused on health and wellness, with “a contextually-inspired façade weaving together panels of warm brick and Italian terra cotta.” Built by Triton Construction and designed by CetraRuddy for developer Delancey Street Associates, the façades reveal a sunlit suite of amenities and an expansive garden.</p> <p>Availability of the material is one benefit, according to architect Ede’s firm three in Texas: “Terra-cotta panels are relatively accessible and transportable, so products made around the world, from Mexico to China to Europe, have boosted availability during recent supply logjams, which could be contributing to a more recent resurgence in interest.” On the other hand, terra-cotta is heavy and relatively costly, says San Francisco-based Lada Kocherovsky, AIA, past president of the city’s CREW chapter and Principal with Page &amp; Turnbull, an authority on new architectural design and preservation. “The use of terra cotta as ornamental material has a fascinating history, and contemporary applications are seeing renewed interest lately, including terra-cotta rainscreens in the Bay Area over recent years,” she says. “It’s beautiful and durable, though the pure cost of it, the challenges of installation, and the added weight on the structure proves to be cost prohibitive on many projects.”</p> <h2>Filtering and lightness</h2> <p>Another option for lower-weight and more economical façade systems is the insulated metal panel (IMP), which benefits from a generally robust supply and new ideas in design and constructability. Bringing improved performance and reduced environmental impact, IMPs offer tunable insulating qualities and desirable solar reflectance and infrared emittance properties that help building owner-operators lower peak energy demand and cut total energy usage.</p> <p>On top of that, metal is a highly resilient, durable cladding with panel joints shaped specifically for rainwater control effectiveness. So while IMPs can be used as a backup system behind a traditional cladding, <a href="https://americas.uli.org/essex-crossing-2021-uli-americas-awards-for-excellence-finalist/" target="_blank">the exterior layer can be omitted</a> in most applications, says Building Science Corp’s Lstiburek. “The exterior metal face of the panel protects the remainder of the assembly from exposure to ultraviolet radiation, protects the remainder of the assembly from physical damage, and typically satisfies aesthetic requirements for the application,” according to Lstiburek. “The exterior face of the insulated metal panel system integrated with drained joint assemblies addresses the rainwater control aspects of traditional cladding. The exterior face of the insulated metal panel system becomes the cladding.”</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="4. Rainscreens copy.jpg" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="9de2aa06-e9d3-40cb-8691-e0fd244d664f" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/4.%20Rainscreens%20copy.jpg" width="1800" height="566" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Example rainscreen wall assemblies. Courtesy Rainscreen Association in North America</figcaption></figure><p>Effective, integral barriers are often a primary goal for enclosure design, as architect Zack Aders, AIA, LEED AP, with the nonprofit project leader New York City Economic Development Corporation, explains: “We have used passive strategies to create a tightly sealed, well-insulated envelope with high performance glazing to reduce heating and cooling loads, which is key to achieving a net positive energy building.” He adds that a whole-building blower door test at the end of construction is valuable to confirm expectations are met for air tightness.</p> <p>Yet a more recent and perhaps more radical direction in building envelopes has emerged that considers the exterior less as a barrier and more as a filter, similar to natural integuments or entire organisms that open and close to fresh air, to direct solar warming in winter, and even to controlled moisture and bulk water.</p> <p>“As structural engineers, it has been satisfying to see the results of the structural thinness of a single-layer solution, which in one case allows the gridshell to become a membrane between interior and exterior—rather than a barrier,” according to structural engineer Craig Schwitter, a Senior Partner and Global Board Chair for Buro Happold. “This environmental filter balances forces that make up the experience and the environment, creating comfort and possibility even as it engenders a sense of enticement, wonder and delight.”</p> <h2>Commissioning + Cladding = Confidence</h2> <p>To make cladding choices that promise longevity, sustainability, and optimized return on investment, more building teams are incorporating a commissioning process.</p> <p>“Commissioning has been key tool for public projects to insert accountability in meeting design criteria,” says Zack Aders, AIA, LEED AP, with the nonprofit project leader New York City Economic Development Corporation. “Envelope commissioning in particular is critical to ensure that weather-resistive barriers are applied correctly and continuously and that air sealing details perform as designed.”</p> <p>According to engineering firm Simpson Gumpertz &amp; Heger, enclosure commissioning is outlined in both LEED and ASTM E2813 to orient building teams. “To be truly effective, building enclosure commissioning should begin in the predesign phase and continue through the design, preconstruction, and construction phases of the project,” <a href="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/8-strategies-successful-building-enclosure-commissioning" target="_blank">says the firm</a>, which holds a specialty in façade engineering. ASTM E2813, for example, requires commissioning to begin during design development at minimum, and for better, enhanced commissioning, it should start in schematics.</p> <p>Beginning-to-end is the mantra for enclosure excellence: A key part of the process for enhanced commissioning, for example, is to plan for oversight during construction. This vastly improves the resolution of such challenges as constructability, material compatibility, and full continuity of insulation, or CI, and weather-resistive barriers, or WRBs.</p> <p>“Verifying these details as the building is being constructed allows us to address any gaps before the walls are closed up, helping the team avoid costly rework,” says Aders.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdc" hreflang="en">BD+C</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/10-aia-luhsw" hreflang="en">1.0 AIA LU/HSW</a></div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/exterior" hreflang="en">Exterior</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/moisture-solutions" hreflang="en">Moisture Solutions</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/10-aia-luhsw" hreflang="en">1.0 AIA LU/HSW</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/building-envelope" hreflang="en">Building Envelope</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/building-technology" hreflang="en">Building Technology</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/claddingwall-systems" hreflang="en">Cladding/Wall systems</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdcu/building-envelope-0" hreflang="en">Building Envelope</a></div> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/campus/bdc" hreflang="en">BD+C</a></div> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdc-university-course" hreflang="en">BD+C University Course</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-enclosure-systems" hreflang="en">Building Enclosure Systems</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-materials" hreflang="en">Building Materials</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/contractors" hreflang="en">Contractors</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers" hreflang="en">Designers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers-specifiers-landscape-architects" hreflang="en">Designers / Specifiers / Landscape Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/engineers" hreflang="en">Engineers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/architects" hreflang="en">Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-tech" hreflang="en">Building Tech</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/cladding-and-facade-systems" hreflang="en">Cladding and Facade Systems</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency" hreflang="en">Energy Efficiency</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency/energy-efficient-design" hreflang="en">Energy-Efficient Design</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/bdc-university-course" hreflang="en">BD+C University Course</a></div> <div class="uk-margin">Off</div> <div> <div>File Preview</div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><div class="pdfpreview" id="pdfpreview-90048"> <span class="pdfpreview-image-wrapper"> <img alt="" title="" class="pdfpreview-file" src="/sites/bdc/files/pdfpreview/90048-082022%20AIA%20course%20cladding.png" width="857" height="1024" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </span> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 24 Aug 2022 18:08:31 +0000 dbarista 50272 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com New Mass. climate and energy law allows local bans on fossil fuel-powered appliances http://www.bdcnetwork.com/new-mass-climate-and-energy-law-allows-local-bans-fossil-fuel-powered-appliances <span>New Mass. climate and energy law allows local bans on fossil fuel-powered appliances</span> <div class="uk-margin">0</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mcrumbley" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mcrumbley</span></span> <span>Tue, 08/23/2022 - 09:24</span> <div class="uk-margin"><p>A sweeping Massachusetts climate and energy bill recently signed into law by Republican governor Charlie Baker allows local bans on fossil fuel-powered appliances.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Peter Fabris, Contributing Editor</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/Sustainability%20laws.jpg" width="1800" height="1200" alt="Sustainability laws" title="Sustainability laws" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Controversial measure survives in far-reaching bill aimed at net-zero GHG emissions by 2050.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/contractors" hreflang="en">Contractors</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers" hreflang="en">Designers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers-specifiers-landscape-architects" hreflang="en">Designers / Specifiers / Landscape Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/engineers" hreflang="en">Engineers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/facility-managers" hreflang="en">Facility Managers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/architects" hreflang="en">Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy" hreflang="en">Energy</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency" hreflang="en">Energy Efficiency</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/resources/codes-and-standards" hreflang="en">Codes and Standards</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/codes-and-standards/codes" hreflang="en">Codes</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/codes-and-standards/legislation" hreflang="en">Legislation</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/codes-and-standards/regulations" hreflang="en">Regulations</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/codes-and-standards/standards" hreflang="en">Standards</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>A sweeping Massachusetts climate and energy bill recently signed into law by Republican governor Charlie Baker allows local bans on fossil fuel-powered appliances.</p> <p>The controversial measure survived debate in the state legislature. It makes it legal for 10 municipalities to ban fossil fuel-powered appliances in new buildings. A requirement that cities meet affordable housing quotas before they can ban fossil fuel infrastructure in new buildings, helped sway the governor who was wary of allowing bans of fossil fuel appliances. Another provision precludes life sciences labs and health care facilities from being affected by the bans, making the law more palatable to some lawmakers.</p> <p>The law also requires electric utilities to buy 5,600 megawatts of new offshore wind capacity by 2027, up from a former goal of 4,000 megawatts. It also removes a controversial price cap that required every new wind project to offer cheaper electricity than the previous one.</p> <p>Other parts of the bill aim to shore up the electric grid, decarbonize the Boston-area transit system by 2040, and require all new cars sold in the state to be zero-emissions by 2035.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/new-mass-climate-and-energy-law-allows-local-bans-fossil-fuel-powered-appliances" data-a2a-title="New Mass. climate and energy law allows local bans on fossil fuel-powered appliances"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Fnew-mass-climate-and-energy-law-allows-local-bans-fossil-fuel-powered-appliances&amp;title=New%20Mass.%20climate%20and%20energy%20law%20allows%20local%20bans%20on%20fossil%20fuel-powered%20appliances"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Tue, 23 Aug 2022 14:24:51 +0000 mcrumbley 50266 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Less bad is no longer good enough http://www.bdcnetwork.com/blog/less-bad-no-longer-good-enough <span>Less bad is no longer good enough</span> <div class="uk-margin">0</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mcrumbley" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mcrumbley</span></span> <span>Mon, 08/22/2022 - 09:09</span> <div class="uk-margin"><p>As we enter the next phase of our fight against climate change, I am cautiously optimistic about our sustainable future and the design industry’s ability to affect what the American Institute of Architects (AIA) calls the biggest challenge of our generation.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Dan Heinfeld</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/LPA%20sustainable%20lead%20image%20copy.jpg" width="1800" height="819" alt="LPA sustainable lead image" title="LPA sustainable lead image" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/contractors" hreflang="en">Contractors</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers" hreflang="en">Designers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers-specifiers-landscape-architects" hreflang="en">Designers / Specifiers / Landscape Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/engineers" hreflang="en">Engineers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/facility-managers" hreflang="en">Facility Managers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/architects" hreflang="en">Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/building-owner" hreflang="en">Building Owners</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency" hreflang="en">Energy Efficiency</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency/energy-efficient-design" hreflang="en">Energy-Efficient Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/sustainability" hreflang="en">Sustainability</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>As we enter the next phase of our fight against climate change, I am cautiously optimistic about our sustainable future and the design industry’s ability to affect what the <a href="https://www.aia.org/" target="_blank">American Institute of Architects (AIA</a>) calls the biggest challenge of our generation.</p> <p>I’m optimistic because, for the first time, I have clients who are saying this is something they want to do. We no longer have to sell them on the benefits and importance of sustainability measures. Schools are asking us how to design net zero campuses. Corporations want information on electrification and carbon emission reductions. They know it’s in their best interest to look at these things now — the general public and investors are demanding that the industry address ESG (environmental, social and governance) goals.</p> <p>At the same time, I’m concerned that the industry is not moving fast enough. The AEC industry has always been slow to react, and, unfortunately, we’re repeating history.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Santa Clara Library net zero energy" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="bd351150-0fe8-4e5d-83a7-b75c995ecf00" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/Santa%20Clara%20Library%20Net%20zero%20energy%20copy.jpg" width="1800" height="1051" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Rendering of the net zero energy, Santa Clara County Library District Administration Building Annex. Courtesy LPA.</figcaption></figure><p>We are at a point when being “less bad” is not good enough. Our design and construction process can’t simply be about reducing the potential harm; we must be part of the solution. Aiming for “less bad” can’t be standard practice. Incremental changes won’t get us over the next hurdles. It must be a revolutionary change. The time for incremental steps is over.</p> <p>The AEC industry must create projects that contribute to a more sustainable future. Our work should aspire to enhance our environment and make a positive impact, not simply to decrease the damage of our work. We need to embrace and promote an integrated design process, giving engineers, landscape architects, interior designers, builders and clients a seat at the table from the very beginning of the process.</p> <p>Collaboration is the only way to achieve meaningful results that are needed to achieve:</p> <ul><li>Net zero energy use</li> <li>Deep reductions in embodied carbon</li> <li>Elimination of fossil fuels</li> <li>Carbon sequestration</li> <li>Habitat restoration</li> </ul><p>The only way we are going to make a real difference is with scale — not just a handful of projects. We must be purposeful in finding sustainable strategies for every project. As an industry we need to be consistent and ruthless in making energy efficiency and carbon emission reductions a measure of design excellence.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="LEED Platinum Nature Center Preschool" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="a0aed749-24b6-4a66-83a0-c835dbf755ec" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/LEED%20Platinum%20Nature%20Center%20Preschool%20copy.jpg" width="1800" height="1051" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>The net zero energy, LEED Platinum Environmental Nature Center Preschool. Courtesy LPA.</figcaption></figure><p>Here are three areas where the industry and policy changes can make a difference:</p> <h2>AIA COTE AWARDS</h2> <p>This award program is meant to promote and hold out as an example the 10 best sustainably designed projects created by AIA members each year. Yet year after year many of the winning projects don’t meet the AIA 2030 Commitment for predicted energy performance. This disconnect sends mixed messages. All AIA awards programs should adopt the 2030 Commitment as a minimum requirement for award criteria. We all know the excuses for not doing it: Clients don’t care about the 2030 Commitment; small firms might lose opportunities. We don’t need excuses now; we need action. This is an area that architects can control, and we need to show leadership.</p> <h2>LEED ENERGY EFFICIENCY</h2> <p>This is another area where an industry-focused organization can make changes that would greatly improve energy efficiency. The recently released LEED version 4.1 talks a good game, but the energy efficiency requirements are sadly out of step with where the industry can and should be. It is still possible to complete a LEED-certified building with only marginally better energy performance than code minimum energy efficiency standards. That isn’t moving the needle.</p> <h2>GOVERNMENT REQUIREMENTS</h2> <p>As an industry, this is sensitive territory. But only updated building codes will really push the industry to do better. We should support stronger codes that require change. It’s unbelievable that in 2022 we still have eight states that do not have statewide energy codes for building construction. Of the 42 that do, only five states have adopted codes in line with ASHRAE 90.1-2019 requirements for energy efficiency. Unfortunately, a project that meets those “stricter” energy code requirements is estimated to be 52% better than the CBECS benchmark that the 2030 Commitment is based on.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="El Cerrito Workforce Housing net zero energy" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="5d5cd32f-351d-46f3-ba37-1c07a2a8ef47" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/El%20Cerritto%20Workforce%20net%20zero%20energy%20copy.jpg" width="1800" height="1274" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Rendering of the net zero energy, El Cerrito Workforce Housing. Courtesy LPA.</figcaption></figure><p>That is not good enough.</p> <p>It’s time for regulations to push for building electrification, increased performance requirements for new construction and incentives to reuse and upgrade existing structures. As long as codes are not in step with the industry’s carbon reduction goals we will never hit the aggressive target the 2030 Commitment has set.</p> <p>Now is the time: everyone understands the goals and the urgency. But we still need to take bold action as an industry if we are going to achieve significant change.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>The AEC industry won’t reach its sustainability goals through incremental steps. The time is right for big moves.</p> </div> Mon, 22 Aug 2022 14:09:39 +0000 mcrumbley 50248 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com DOE funds 18 projects developing tech to enable buildings to store carbon http://www.bdcnetwork.com/doe-funds-18-projects-developing-tech-enable-buildings-store-carbon <span>DOE funds 18 projects developing tech to enable buildings to store carbon</span> <div class="uk-margin">0</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mcrumbley" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mcrumbley</span></span> <span>Tue, 08/16/2022 - 11:41</span> <div class="uk-margin"><p>The Department of Energy announced $39 million in awards for 18 projects that are developing technologies to transform buildings into net carbon storage structures.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Peter Fabris, Contributing Editor</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/Net%20carbon%20storage%20structures.jpg" width="1800" height="1350" alt="Net carbon storage structures" title="Net carbon storage structures" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Embodied carbon emissions reduced via alternative concrete and cement materials.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/contractors" hreflang="en">Contractors</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers" hreflang="en">Designers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers-specifiers-landscape-architects" hreflang="en">Designers / Specifiers / Landscape Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/engineers" hreflang="en">Engineers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/facility-managers" hreflang="en">Facility Managers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/architects" hreflang="en">Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/building-owner" hreflang="en">Building Owners</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency" hreflang="en">Energy Efficiency</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency/energy-efficient-design" hreflang="en">Energy-Efficient Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/resources/codes-and-standards" hreflang="en">Codes and Standards</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/codes-and-standards/codes" hreflang="en">Codes</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/codes-and-standards/legislation" hreflang="en">Legislation</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/codes-and-standards/regulations" hreflang="en">Regulations</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/codes-and-standards/standards" hreflang="en">Standards</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/sustainability" hreflang="en">Sustainability</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>The <a href="https://www.energy.gov/" target="_blank">Department of Energy</a> announced $39 million in awards for 18 projects that are developing technologies to transform buildings into net carbon storage structures.<br />  <br /> Several of the awards are targeted for alternative concrete and cement materials as part of DOE’s drive to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the built environment. “There’s huge, untapped potential in reimagining building materials and construction techniques as carbon sinks,” Jennifer M. Granholm, DOE secretary, said in a press release.</p> <p>Other projects funded by the DOE include:</p> <ul><li>Development of “living” wood with the strength of steel, a self-healing capability, and combined carbon-sequestering benefits from wood and microbes by Purdue University.</li> <li>Development of a composite panel containing bio-derived natural fibers that exhibit excellent mechanical and functional properties while maintaining a carbon-negative footprint by SkyNano LLC.</li> <li>Design of a carbon-negative, medium-size building structure using a high-performance floor system with maximized surface area for carbon absorption that uses a novel carbon absorbing concrete mixture as a building material at the University of Pennsylvania.</li> </ul><p>The DOE awards are intended to help meet the goal of net zero emissions by 2050 outlined in an executive order signed by President Biden last year to make the federal government carbon neutral. The program aims for a 65% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.</p> <p> </p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/doe-funds-18-projects-developing-tech-enable-buildings-store-carbon" data-a2a-title="DOE funds 18 projects developing tech to enable buildings to store carbon"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Fdoe-funds-18-projects-developing-tech-enable-buildings-store-carbon&amp;title=DOE%20funds%2018%20projects%20developing%20tech%20to%20enable%20buildings%20to%20store%20carbon"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Tue, 16 Aug 2022 16:41:17 +0000 mcrumbley 50231 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Boston high-rise will be largest Passive House office building in the world http://www.bdcnetwork.com/boston-high-rise-will-be-largest-passive-house-office-building-world <span>Boston high-rise will be largest Passive House office building in the world</span> <div class="uk-margin">0</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mcrumbley" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mcrumbley</span></span> <span>Mon, 08/15/2022 - 09:58</span> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Winthrop Center, a new 691-foot tall, mixed-use tower in Boston was recently honored with the Passive House Trailblazer award.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Peter Fabris, Contributing Editor</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/Winthrop%20ext%201.jpg" width="1800" height="1200" alt="Winthrop Center ext 1" title="Winthrop Center ext 1" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Winthrop Center, 691-foot tall, mixed-use tower, has 812,000 sf of Passive House office space.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/contractors" hreflang="en">Contractors</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers" hreflang="en">Designers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers-specifiers-landscape-architects" hreflang="en">Designers / Specifiers / Landscape Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/engineers" hreflang="en">Engineers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/facility-managers" hreflang="en">Facility Managers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/architects" hreflang="en">Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/building-owner" hreflang="en">Building Owners</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency" hreflang="en">Energy Efficiency</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency/energy-efficient-design" hreflang="en">Energy-Efficient Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/mixed-use" hreflang="en">Mixed-Use</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/sustainability" hreflang="en">Sustainability</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Winthrop Center, a new 691-foot tall, mixed-use tower in Boston was recently honored with the Passive House Trailblazer award. Built to stringent Passive House standards, the structure’s 812,000 sf of office space will be the largest office built to those standards in the world when it is completed in 2023. The project models “the most energy efficient solution for large scale buildings” to date, according to a news release.</p> <p>“Passive House is the route to zero operational carbon, which is why Winthrop Center is a globally important building,” said Craig Stevenson, Passive House Network board chair. The project “is paving the path for developers searching for more energy-efficient solutions and for cities and states trying to meet carbon reduction goals.”</p> <p>A typical Class A building in Boston’s existing stock uses 150% more energy than Winthrop Center, and existing LEED Platinum buildings in Boston use 60% more energy than the building’s office space is projected to use. The project will also deliver 510,000 sf of residential space, including 317 luxury residences located in the center of Boston.</p> <p>Winthrop Center will be the most energy efficient large-scale building ever built in a cold climate, the release says. It incorporates a well-insulated building façade, air-tight exterior envelope, and advanced energy recovery ventilation (ERV) system for the office space. “In addition to eliminating heating and cooling inefficiencies, this integrated system allows the building to deliver better managed and higher quality air, positively impacting employee health, productivity, and sense of well-being,” the release says.</p> <p>The project is also projected to achieve WELL Gold certification and WIRED Platinum, the highest quality rating of a building’s infrastructure and Internet connections. Tenants and owners will be equipped with integrated touchless smart building solutions including a network of on-demand space and services. Features include touchless mobile access for elevators, entry and turnstiles, guest access, conference pod scheduling, pet amenities, parking, and food and beverage.</p> <p>The ground floor will include a 24,000-sf gathering space called “The Connector” that will invite the public in for certain events. The building will include “a world-class fitness center, and top-tier amenities” through a 25,000-sf common area known as “The Collective.”</p> <p>The structure will feature plentiful natural light with 10-foot-high windows and a limited column structural design with unobstructed sight lines. The office space will provide a flexible and adaptable environment with distinctive floorplans. Tenants will be able to access privacy and adjacent collaboration in different wings of each floor, while staying connected to common and community spaces.</p> <p>On the building team:<br /> Owner and/or developer: <a href="https://mpbos.com/" target="_blank">MP Boston</a><br /> Design architect: <a href="https://handelarchitects.com/" target="_blank">Handel Architects</a><br /> Architect of record: Handel Architects<br /> MEP engineer: WSP, Boston Office<br /> Structural engineer: <a href="https://www.de-simone.com/" target="_blank">DESimone Engineering</a><br /> General contractor/construction manager:<a href="https://www.suffolk.com/" target="_blank"> Suffolk Construction</a></p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Winthrop Center ext 2" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="d5bde702-23ea-4955-be9c-9accdedefe62" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/Winthrop%20ext%202.jpg" width="1800" height="1837" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Courtesy MP Boston.</figcaption></figure><figure role="group"><img alt="Winthrop Center ext 3" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="592d36bd-deb5-43cd-a67a-84e04c93f9d7" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/Winthrop%20ext%203.jpg" width="1800" height="2401" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Courtesy MP Boston.</figcaption></figure><p> </p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/boston-high-rise-will-be-largest-passive-house-office-building-world" data-a2a-title="Boston high-rise will be largest Passive House office building in the world"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Fboston-high-rise-will-be-largest-passive-house-office-building-world&amp;title=Boston%20high-rise%20will%20be%20largest%20Passive%20House%20office%20building%20in%20the%20world"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Mon, 15 Aug 2022 14:58:36 +0000 mcrumbley 50223 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Denver builds the nation’s first carbon-positive hotel http://www.bdcnetwork.com/denver-builds-nations-first-carbon-positive-hotel <span>Denver builds the nation’s first carbon-positive hotel</span> <div class="uk-margin">0</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mcrumbley" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mcrumbley</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/12/2022 - 09:41</span> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-sector-reports/hotel-facilities" hreflang="en">Hotel Facilities</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Touted as the nation’s first carbon-positive hotel, Populus recently broke ground in downtown Denver.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Novid Parsi, Contributing Editor</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/Populus%20Hotel%20ext%201.png" width="1800" height="1393" alt="Populus Hotel ext 1" title="Populus Hotel ext 1" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Designed by Studio Gang, the 13-floor hotel will feature eye-shaped windows inspired by the area’s Aspen trees.</p> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-sector-reports/hotel-facilities" hreflang="en">Hotel Facilities</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-sector-reports/hotel-facilities-0" hreflang="en">Hotel Facilities</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/contractors" hreflang="en">Contractors</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers" hreflang="en">Designers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers-specifiers-landscape-architects" hreflang="en">Designers / Specifiers / Landscape Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/engineers" hreflang="en">Engineers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/facility-managers" hreflang="en">Facility Managers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/architects" hreflang="en">Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/building-owner" hreflang="en">Building Owners</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency" hreflang="en">Energy Efficiency</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency/energy-efficient-design" hreflang="en">Energy-Efficient Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/sustainability" hreflang="en">Sustainability</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Touted as the nation’s first carbon-positive hotel,<a href="https://urban-villages.com/portfolio/populus/" target="_blank"> Populus</a> recently broke ground in downtown Denver. Scheduled to open in late 2023, Populus is a 13-story, 265-room hotel with a rooftop restaurant and bar, all designed by <a href="https://studiogang.com/" target="_blank">Studio Gang.</a></p> <p>Developed by <a href="https://urban-villages.com/" target="_blank">Urban Villages</a>, the triangular-shaped, 130,000-square-foot building will be entirely carbon positive, from construction to operations. Populus will minimize its carbon footprint in the development stage by using low-carbon concrete mixes and high-recycled content materials, maximizing structural efficiency, using fewer finish materials, and minimizing waste. The team will consider the carbon footprint of the origin and creation of the materials as well as their transport. The hotel’s overall use (operational carbon) and every guest stay will be offset, in addition to the building’s embodied carbon.</p> <p>The project also will involve an offsite ecological effort, including an initial commitment to plant trees that represent over 5,000 acres of forest, offsetting the equivalent of nearly 500,000 gallons of gas.</p> <p>With design by Studio Gang, and with the <a href="https://www.beckgroup.com/" target="_blank">Beck Group</a> as the architect of record, Populus draws inspiration from the area’s iconic Aspen tree. Studio Gang designed the hotel, its first building in Colorado, with eye-shaped windows that echo the Aspen eyes. As part of the overall green vision, “lids” over each window extend slightly outward to shade the interior, improve energy performance, and channel rainwater.</p> <p>Inside, the windows change in size to reflect the public or private aspect of various spaces—with windows up to 30 feet high at the building’s base. In the rooms, the windows not only provide immersive mountain and city views but also serve as seats or desks, further connecting occupants with the outdoors. </p> <p>“Improving the resiliency of our cities has never been more urgent—and it includes reducing carbon emissions as well as strengthening community bonds,” Jeanne Gang, founder of Studio Gang, said in a statement. “We’ve designed Populus to be a new destination in downtown Denver that combines these environmental and social ambitions.”</p> <p>On the Building Team:<br /> Owner and/or developer: Urban Villages<br /> Design architect: Studio Gang<br /> Architect of record: The Beck Group<br /> MEP engineer: <a href="https://klokgroup.com/" target="_blank">Klok Group</a><br /> Structural engineer: <a href="https://www.studionyl.com/" target="_blank">Studio NYL</a><br /> General contractor/construction manager: <a href="https://www.beckgroup.com/featured-employees/matt-archuletta/" target="_blank">Matt Archuletta</a></p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Populus Hotel ext 2" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="ad66b24e-954b-432d-87a2-038f1928ef74" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/Populus%20Hotel%20ext%202.png" width="1800" height="1071" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Courtesy Studio Gang.</figcaption></figure><figure role="group"><img alt="Populus Hotel ext 3" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="7066b9d6-9698-4f05-a21f-a4b345990770" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/Populus%20Hotel%20ext%203.png" width="1800" height="1585" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Courtesy Studio Gang.</figcaption></figure><p> </p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_24 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://www.bdcnetwork.com/denver-builds-nations-first-carbon-positive-hotel" data-a2a-title="Denver builds the nation’s first carbon-positive hotel"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/facebook.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/twitter.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_linkedin"><img src="/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/linkedin.svg" height="24" width="24" alt="linkedin"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bdcnetwork.com%2Fdenver-builds-nations-first-carbon-positive-hotel&amp;title=Denver%20builds%20the%20nation%E2%80%99s%20first%20carbon-positive%20hotel"><img src="https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sites/bdc/themes/sgcuikit/images/link.svg" alt="Share"></a></span> Fri, 12 Aug 2022 14:41:59 +0000 mcrumbley 50218 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Commercial Energy Efficiency: Finally “In-the-Money!” http://www.bdcnetwork.com/blog/commercial-energy-efficiency-finally-money <span>Commercial Energy Efficiency: Finally “In-the-Money!”</span> <div class="uk-margin">0</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mcrumbley" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mcrumbley</span></span> <span>Thu, 08/11/2022 - 10:37</span> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency" hreflang="en">Energy Efficiency</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><p> By now, many business leaders are out in front of policymakers on prioritizing the energy transition.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>Andrew Henderson and  Russell Clarke</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/Commercial%20energy%20efficiency.jpeg" width="1800" height="468" alt="Commercial energy efficiency" title="Commercial energy efficiency" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/contractors" hreflang="en">Contractors</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers" hreflang="en">Designers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers-specifiers-landscape-architects" hreflang="en">Designers / Specifiers / Landscape Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/engineers" hreflang="en">Engineers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/facility-managers" hreflang="en">Facility Managers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/architects" hreflang="en">Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/building-owner" hreflang="en">Building Owners</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency" hreflang="en">Energy Efficiency</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency/energy-efficient-design" hreflang="en">Energy-Efficient Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/sustainability" hreflang="en">Sustainability</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>In 2021, the economic costs of climate change were laid bare in the forest fires of one of British Columbia’s key lumber-growing regions and the winter storm that took down part of Texas’ power grid, to name just two extreme weather events. By now, many business leaders are out in front of policymakers on prioritizing the energy transition.</p> <p>Though the roadmap to reaching net zero is intricate, the value proposition is fairly simple. Delaying action could cost the U.S. $14.5 trillion, estimates Deloitte, while decarbonization could expand the economy by $3 trillion to 2050.</p> <p>A large piece of this undertaking will be upgrades to every building currently standing, since two-thirds of these will still exist in 2040, according to the nonprofit Architecture 2030, and, in terms of carbon abatement costs, energy efficiency projects outperform other approaches like carbon capture and growth of renewable energy sources. Building upgrades will encompass improved energy efficiency, a shift to renewable energy sources and potentially generation or sourcing of renewable energy.</p> <p>Energy service companies (ESCO) have been doing this work for decades, dating back to the 1992 Clean Air Act, which introduced provisions to reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Historically, this market has focused on municipalities, universities, schools and hospitals (MUSH); together with federal contracts, this has accounted for 93% of the total ESCO market, according to research by Berkeley Lab. Commercial and infrastructure (C&amp;I) projects currently account for just 7%, but FMI estimates that the commercial opportunity is significantly larger than the federal and MUSH market, and remains largely untapped.</p> <p>While adoption has been slow in the private sector, we have reached a tipping point. Commercial operators know they need to move toward decarbonization, creating a huge pool of demand, and the key to unlocking the market potential is in the funding model.</p> <h2>The Underpenetrated C&amp;I Market</h2> <p>Energy efficiency is, itself, a resource and ESCOs use the value of that resource to minimize, and in the case of energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) either partially or fully remove, a customer’s cost to finance an efficiency project. Retrofits can be paid for with future energy savings, which have in the past played out over a 15- to 20-year period. This has been attractive for public owners since they have the ability to issue bonds to fund projects and are focused on the longer-term public good rather than maximization of profits.</p> <p>FMI sees a huge opportunity, however, in the commercial market for companies who can leverage one of the many innovative contracting approaches now active in the market. There is approximately 100 billion square feet of commercial property in the U.S. that will need to be managed and upgraded in the decades to come. What’s more, the payback period to realize savings can be shortened as technology continues to improve.</p> <p>A comprehensive HVAC and controls retrofit to a facility can now deliver substantial energy savings to recoup the cost of a project within two to five years. Skilled ESCOs can also leverage energy procurement solutions and distributed energy resources like solar and storage to maximize the energy profile of a commercial customer. That is, they can improve the equation on both the demand and supply side. Incentives from state and utility bodies have also improved as the energy transition has become a bigger priority. Federally, incentives like the 179D deduction for construction expenditures are available, and in the private sphere, environmental, social and governance (ESG) mandates are driving uptake of the tech. Where energy efficiency was once a nice-to-have, it is becoming both more profitable and a cornerstone of corporate compliance.</p> <h2>Case Study</h2> <p>Stark Tech audited all the current and previous energy agreements for Life Storage, Inc,, which has 1,000 facilities across the U.S., then negotiated lower procurement prices for all deregulated accounts. This created $532,000 of savings1 in the first year—enough to pay for procurement services for the next seven years.</p> <h2>Getting the Funding Model Right</h2> <p>While commercial owners can finance efficiency projects in similar ways to other construction projects, there are now many other potential contracting mechanisms and financing sources. One such option that has gained significant traction lately is the energy as a service (EaaS) model. EaaS providers may cover the full installation costs of projects and continue to own the underlying assets. The customer simply pays the provider an ongoing service fee for operations and maintenance of those assets, turning a capital expense into an operating expense that can be more easily managed.</p> <p>Some efficiency financing models may not work due to conflicts between tenant and landlord priorities. For situations where the building owner is not paying the utility bills, and may not want to pay for efficiency upgrades, property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing mechanisms can allow for facility upgrades to be included on a utility bill, and to be transferred to subsequent tenants.</p> <p>We see an increasing shift in the extent to which companies are using their own operating capital to support efficiency and other environmentally friendly initiatives. A healthy bottom line is important, but corporations are recognizing the need to focus on the longer term and lead the way to net zero commitments. This was a big focus in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), which earmarked $50 billion for resilience projects, including weatherizing of homes and federal buildings, and $65 billion for clean energy transmission. The Department of Energy has reported that $724 million of the funding will be spent using ESPCs and utility energy service contracts.</p> <h2>Case Study</h2> <p>Ally Energy Solutions worked with a big box retailer, performing a close audit of utility tariffs impacting the retailer’s 180 facilities. To eliminate usage penalties and avoid overloading power transformers, Ally Energy Solutions developed a turnkey project to upgrade analytics and equipment specification, then install and verify efficiencies, reporting a return on investment in less than three years, with $950,0002 of savings annually.</p> <h2>How to Get Started</h2> <p>One proven path to success for a commercial ESCO is to target and collect strong national accounts that can offer the ability to scale their offerings across a number of facilities more easily—from Amazon to Target, Prologis, 7/11 and McDonalds, there are countless companies with a large footprint who would be great long-term engagements.</p> <p>Winning these accounts will become increasingly competitive as more providers enter the space, and procurement officers look for a resume of successful projects that delivered measurable value. Those firms who were established early on or have deep relationships with commercial owners could have an advantage when it comes to landing the next big national account.</p> <p>To begin, ESCOs need to do their market research and thoroughly assess potential candidates. They may need to educate multiple decision makers as to the viability of certain energy efficiency projects and the various financing mechanisms, then make the case that they have the experience and skill to successfully retrofit and manage a company’s energy services. Zeroing in on potential clients begins with asking “Who has a need today to meet their goals for tomorrow?” and “Who has the access to capital and/or the proper project profiles to do it at scale?”</p> <h2>Looking Forward</h2> <p>President Joe Biden has set a target of 50% to 52% reduction in carbon emissions from 2005 levels by the year 2030. Efficiency projects have historically been viewed as a means to greater profitability, and they are increasingly part of a prudent financial plan, but the driver here is a true shift in the energy ecosystem. The transition is being driven by federal and state policy, and by private and public firms that are establishing their own mandates and pushing the envelope on what can be achieved. In many cases executives are being compensated on meeting ESG related metrics and goals. We are behind on progress toward emissions targets and the race is on. To mitigate future harm and be a part of the solution, the C&amp;I energy efficiency market offers a new avenue of opportunity.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p> By now, many business leaders are out in front of policymakers on prioritizing the energy transition.</p> </div> Thu, 11 Aug 2022 15:37:50 +0000 mcrumbley 50216 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com Mass timber and net zero design for higher education and lab buildings http://www.bdcnetwork.com/blog/mass-timber-and-net-zero-design-higher-education-and-lab-buildings <span>Mass timber and net zero design for higher education and lab buildings</span> <div class="uk-margin">0</div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/mcrumbley" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mcrumbley</span></span> <span>Mon, 08/08/2022 - 09:52</span> <div class="uk-margin"><p>When sourced from sustainably managed forests, the use of wood as a replacement for concrete and steel on larger scale construction projects has myriad economic and environmental benefits that have been thoroughly outlined in everything from academic journals to the pages of Newsweek.</p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/bdc/files/Mass%20timber%20lead%20image.jpeg" width="1800" height="871" alt="Mass timber lead image" title="Mass timber lead image" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/mass-timber" hreflang="en">Mass Timber</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-sector-reports/education-facility" hreflang="en">Education Facilities</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/education-facilities/higher-education" hreflang="en">Higher Education</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-types/laboratories" hreflang="en">Laboratories</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/contractors" hreflang="en">Contractors</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers" hreflang="en">Designers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/designers-specifiers-landscape-architects" hreflang="en">Designers / Specifiers / Landscape Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/engineers" hreflang="en">Engineers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/facility-managers" hreflang="en">Facility Managers</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/architects" hreflang="en">Architects</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/building-team/building-owner" hreflang="en">Building Owners</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy" hreflang="en">Energy</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency" hreflang="en">Energy Efficiency</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/energy-efficiency/energy-efficient-design" hreflang="en">Energy-Efficient Design</a></div> <div class="uk-margin"><a href="/sustainability" hreflang="en">Sustainability</a></div> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>For those who are involved in the design and construction community, it is likely that you have encountered the topic of mass timber construction over the last few years. And for good reason! When sourced from sustainably managed forests, the use of wood as a replacement for concrete and steel on larger scale construction projects has myriad economic and environmental benefits that have been thoroughly outlined in everything from academic journals to the pages of Newsweek.</p> <p>That being said, out of the approximately 700 mass timber projects that the Wood Products Council estimates to be underway or completed in North America, most of these are for office, residential or commercial uses, with only a small number being designed and built for higher education or laboratory uses. Given the environmental benefits, and the often ambitious sustainability targets of higher education clients, why aren’t we seeing mass timber in more projects on college campuses? While there are likely a number of reasons for this, one may be the fact that there is limited information on the opportunities and synergies that can be found in the use of a mass timber structure for these specific project types. It is for this reason that we are interested in sharing our experience and provide some insight into why you might consider mass timber for Laboratory and Higher Education projects. Before we dive into the detail, though, let’s step back and think about a few questions that we should be asking ourselves as owners and designers when we embark on the design of a new structure.</p> <h2>Are we using wood because it’s cool or because it makes sense?</h2> <p>Is mass timber the right fit for this project and building type in question? What unique opportunities does it afford when being used in an academic or science setting that you might not find with other structural systems?</p> <h2>Is it possible to deliver a high-performance mass timber academic building on a budget?</h2> <p>How does the way that we build up the structure leverage the benefits of the material and reduce material cost, while still meeting the strict performance needs of the higher education programs for which we are designing? How do we achieve aggressive operational and embodied energy reduction goals through the use of hydronic systems while still exposing the beauty of a mass timber structural deck, even when program limitations such as vibration criteria and budget constraints take the option for a raised floor out of the equation?</p> <h2>Wood structure is a good start, but what else can we be doing to decarbonize our projects?</h2> <p>Are we taking advantage of synergies between the unique attributes of a mass timber structure and best practices enclosure design to unlock deeper decarbonization strategies, enabling migration to all-electric hydronic solutions and away from refrigerant-based mechanical systems with high global warming potential, without sacrificing beauty and experience in the process?</p> <p>While there are a number of relevant examples that can answer each of these questions, we are going to look at them together through the lens of a recent project: <a href="https://srgpartnership.com/project/edward-j-ray-hall/" target="_blank">Edward J. Ray Hall for Oregon State University’s Cascades Campus</a> (Ray Hall) in Bend, Oregon. This is a relevant case study, in that it is working to both understand the unique opportunities that mass timber presents in a higher education setting and also pioneer cost-effective and low-impact strategies to achieve net zero operational energy and an overall reduction in embodied carbon. This project is intended to serve as a prototype for future academic buildings on the OSU Cascades campus, but the lessons learned in its development might also help guide anyone who is working to achieve meaningful reductions in embodied and operational carbon on a mass timber higher education project.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="OSU Cascades Campus ext" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="98975a2c-f66e-46d4-983c-05f707ece624" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/OSU%20Cascades%20Campus%20ext.jpeg" width="1800" height="1013" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Courtesy SRG Partnership.</figcaption></figure><h2>Does mass timber make sense for my Academic or Laboratory Project?</h2> <p>The potential benefits of mass timber are plentiful and well documented. The use of a natural material stimulates an innate and positive biophilic response in building occupants. Leveraging prefabricated components can lead to increased ease of assembly, improved precision, shortened construction schedules, and reduced on-site labor demands. Using wood provides the opportunity to support regional economies and reinvigorate rural communities in a way that can bring local industry up to speed with 21st century technologies and practices. When sourced responsibly, it may even serve to sequester carbon and help mitigate the impacts of climate change. But what are the impacts that the system has on how we design? And, more importantly, what are the unique opportunities that a Mass Timber structure can provide that can actually help improve the quality and functionality of our Laboratory and Higher Education environments?</p> <h2>Daylighting, Vibration Control, and Systems Integration</h2> <p>A good first question to ask is: what is different when looking at a mass timber structure vs. a more typical steel or concrete structure? An oft-discussed advantage of using mass timber decks such as CLT or DLT is an inherent ability to span a certain distance without the need for intermediate support. This unique characteristic has enabled designers to eliminate the perimeter beam in our structures, thus unlocking the opportunity to increase the height of our window openings. The only other type of structure that provides a similar advantage is a thick cast-in place or shallower post-tensioned concrete slab – a system that works well for larger scale projects but does not offer the same potential aesthetic, sustainability and scheduling benefits as mass timber – especially for a mid-rise academic or lab building.</p> <p>So how might this opportunity to increase the height of our windows impact how we think about lab and learning spaces? In a number of studies, it has been consistently proven that good daylighting and access to views improve productivity and learning outcomes in academic environments. If one were to apply the recommended 2:1 ratio of aperture height to bay depth for optimized daylighting, higher openings lead to deeper floor plates, opening up flexibility to optimize our classroom and lab layouts without sacrificing the health and performance benefits of providing natural light to our students and researchers.</p> <p>The conditions needed in order to take advantage of the improved daylighting benefits of a mass timber structure also happen to support another critical attribute of successful lab spaces: vibration control. This is tied to the fact that a fairly tight column spacing is needed in order for the mass timber deck to span independently and without the need for perimeter beams. As any structural engineer can attest, the longer a deck goes unsupported, the more deflection will occur, so more frequent columns and interior beams supporting the mass timber deck leads to improved vibration control overall. When coupled with a concrete topping slab, in which you also have the option to run utilities such as electrical and data distribution, you now have a floor assembly that can reap the benefits of mass timber structural systems without sacrificing the performance attributes required for a successful lab environment.</p> <p>The final advantage of this tighter column spacing is the fact that, not only does it allow us to omit the support beam from the outside perimeter of the building, but it allows us to remove it from the interior line of structure as well. The elimination of structural supports perpendicular to the primary beams and columns accommodates clear and unobstructed overhead pathways in the deep bay pockets to run critical systems to and from primary utility runs that distribute down a central circulation and services spine. It is important to note that, in order for lab infrastructure to fully capitalize on these utility routing opportunities, an increased amount of early coordination is required between the fabricators, installers and the design team. The same is true for any wet applications, as the desire for an exposed structure above means that there is nowhere to ‘hide’ the plumbing drops that will eventually need to penetrate the mass timber deck as it makes its way down through the building.</p> <p>On Ray Hall, the design team leveraged this intersection of opportunities afforded by the unique attributes of our mass timber structural system to unlock high performance and cost-effective solutions for Oregon State University Cascades. Fume hoods and their associated ducting were closely coordinated with building structure, strategically placed to utilize the clearances located between primary beams and columns and spaced in a way that wouldn’t adversely impact the daylighting and views from within the space.</p> <p>The team, working closely with <a href="https://www.catenaengineers.com/" target="_blank">Catena Consulting Engineers</a>, also studied the structural column spacing to find a solution that optimizes material use, leverages the spanning abilities of the mass timber deck, and minimizes potential vibration. Starting with a 40’-long panel module, a cost-effective fabrication length typical of most North American CLT suppliers, and considering both 3-ply and 5-ply CLT, the study narrowed the options down to either a 13’4” or a 10’0” column spacing. When coupled with a concrete topping slab, both assemblies were found to meet the required vibration criteria, but by reducing the spans of the CLT deck by a mere 40” we were able to reduce the total amount of wood in our structure by 25-30% through the reduction in CLT panel thickness from 5-ply to 3-ply. The associated decrease in overall weight of the building also led to a decrease in the amount of concrete needed for the foundations and shear walls.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Mass Timber Systems Options" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="6e22d4d0-565a-4746-b848-86d7ba0e7ff9" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/Mass%20Timber%20Systems%20Options.jpeg" width="1800" height="1045" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Courtesy SRG Partnership.</figcaption></figure><h2>Long Term Flexibility, Energy Performance, and Decarbonization</h2> <p>While all of these aforementioned strategies that were implemented on the Ray Hall mass timber structure are designed to accommodate lab type uses, they were also conceived with flexibility in mind so that the individual use of different academic and research spaces can adapt and change over time. This eye towards adaptability can be traced through every decision, from the overall form of the building down to the nuanced relationship between the envelope and the mechanical system, to understand how we can make mass timber academic environments realize their full potential.</p> <p>When initially looking at how the building could be organized, we’ve already looked at how the team identified a bay depth that leveraged the deeper daylighting opportunities that taller openings could accommodate, but also optimized spaces around basic classroom and laboratory planning principles. What hasn’t been discussed is how, when that optimized depth is coupled with a thoughtfully constructed but cost effective enclosure, we were also able to unlock the opportunity for a more flexible, affordable, and sustainable mechanical systems option for the building that was uniquely compatible with our mass timber structural system.</p> <p>When going into Ray Hall, the criteria for our mechanical systems selection was clear: we wanted an energy efficient, flexible, and cost effective strategy that would also have minimal visual impact on the mass timber structure and the CLT deck overhead, but without the use of a raised floor. In addition, we at SRG were keenly interested in following through on our own climate action commitment of reducing not only operational energy, but also the embodied carbon on our projects. Through the lens of mechanical systems, this meant finding a path forward that could minimize the use of refrigerants as a part of our thermal comfort strategy.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Piping Diagram" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="ff2a29a7-c05f-43b7-a7f2-c77384e4398b" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/Piping%20Diagram.jpeg" width="1800" height="1183" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Courtesy SRG Partnership.</figcaption></figure><p>If you ask any architect or engineer who has worked on a commercial project with a modest budget over the last five years, they will tell you that this is easier said than done, as there is a limited set of affordable mechanical solutions that meet the increasingly stringent performance standards that are required of our buildings, let alone the embodied carbon and mass timber specific criteria that we described above. This has led to an increased dependency on the use of VRF (variable refrigerant flow) – an inherently inflexible system that has significantly higher global warming potential when compared with its hydronic counterparts. SRG worked closely with our engineers to find another path – perimeter mounted sensible fan powered boxes.</p> <p>The name is a mouthful, but the technology is straightforward – low temperature hot water and high temperature chilled water is circulated through wall mounted boxes containing low mass highly conductive radiative fins that generate heat and coolth which is then circulated via efficient, compact and quiet booster fans that kick the conditioned air out into the space. It was a cost-competitive hydronic solution that not only checked all of our boxes in terms of performance and flexibility, but also moved the infrastructure for delivering thermal comfort off of the ceiling, out of the floor, and onto the perimeter wall. Additionally, due the fact that these units providing ‘sensible only cooling’, we were able to eliminate the need for condensate piping, saving labor costs and further minimizing the amount infrastructure associated with the mechanical system. With ventilation air being supplied from the corridor side and thermal comfort being addressed via the exterior wall, all that remained on our exposed CLT deck was overhead lighting and fire sprinklers on the CLT structural deck in between.</p> <p>As with most highly sustainable strategies, the successful implementation of this technology not only depended on close collaboration between the owner, contractor, and design team, but it also required that there be a thoughtful architectural response in order for it to be an effective solution. For Ray Hall, that meant taking a critical look at our building enclosure and working towards a facade expression that optimized daylighting potential while still controlling peak cooling loads and limiting the amount of solar heat gain allowed into the space.</p> <p>With an understanding that striking this balance would be critical to the energy and decarbonization goals of the project, from the outset SRG organized the building concept itself around the ability to ‘tune’ the facade on its most sensitive orientations. Working closely with our energy modelers at AEI, we used a parallel coordinates plot visualization tool to map the complex interactions between daylight autonomy, shading strategies, and peak cooling loads to find the optimized facade expression that would allow us to ‘check all of the boxes’ in terms of performance, experience, and beauty.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Building Envelope Design Diagram" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="d8049898-ab58-4761-a92e-93cfa168fdc8" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/Building%20Envelope%20Design%20diagram.jpeg" width="1800" height="1091" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Courtesy SRG Partnerships.</figcaption></figure><figure role="group"><img alt="Side by side diagram" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="603e27e1-892d-4b50-95b4-f02de9a5f097" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/Side%20By%20side%20diagram.jpeg" width="1800" height="456" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Courtesy SRG Partnership.</figcaption></figure><h2>Connecting the Dots</h2> <p>While OSU Cascades Edward J. Ray Hall is just one example of how a deeply integrated design process can unlock the full potential of a mass timber structure on a high-performance education building, the principles and lessons learned are broadly applicable across project types. Through identifying and understanding the interrelationship between the priorities of the project and the technologies that we use to achieve them, we can find ways to get where we need to be from a program, cost, and performance perspective without losing sight of the architecture along the way. Just as teaching pedagogies and research methods evolve to respond to the changing needs and challenges of our 21st century, so does the way that we think about and build our buildings. It is at this unique convergence of established knowledge and best practices with innovations in our tools, technologies, and thinking where we can create new and different paths forward. We no longer need to choose between cost-effective design solutions that can meet and exceed the evolving needs and expectations of the owner, strengthen our regional economy, or address our climate crisis – instead we can create beautiful and lasting architecture that addresses all of the above.</p> <p><strong>This is finding the harmony between the art and science of architecture – this is what true integrated design can look like.</strong></p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Integrated Design" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="f3bdf42c-2be3-4310-88b5-423853c13a6f" src="/sites/bdc/files/inline-images/Integrated%20Design.jpeg" width="1800" height="1013" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Courtesy SRG Partnership.</figcaption></figure><p> </p> </div> <div class="uk-margin"><p>When sourced from sustainably managed forests, the use of wood as a replacement for concrete and steel on larger scale construction projects has myriad economic and environmental benefits that have been thoroughly outlined in everything from academic journals to the pages of Newsweek.</p> </div> Mon, 08 Aug 2022 14:52:51 +0000 mcrumbley 50199 at http://www.bdcnetwork.com