Rick Fedrizzi to step down as USGBC’s Chief Executive next year

Fedrizzi will be leaving an organization that has grown to 76 chapters.

June 29, 2015 |
Rick Fedrizzi to step down as USGBC’s Chief Executive next year

The Washington, D.C.-based USGBC employs 260 people, and last year reported $74.1 million in revenue.

Rick Fedrizzi, who has been the face of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) since he co-founded it in 1993, has informed the Council that he will be stepping down as its CEO, a position he’s held since 2003, at the end of 2016.

The Council’s Board has set up a search committee to identify candidates for the CEO position, to ensure a smooth transition of leadership by January 2017.

“As an industry, we’ve grown and prospered because of a powerful idea that ultimately sparked a movement,” said Fiona Cousins, chair-elect of the USGBC Board of Directors. “That movement has been ably led by Rick Fedrizzi for more than two decades, and it’s that success we’ll continue to build on in the future.” 

Fedrizzi will be leaving an organization that has grown to 76 chapters. The Washington, D.C.-based USGBC employs 260 people, and last year reported $74.1 million in revenue.

Fedrizzi—who was USGBC’s volunteer chairman the first six years of its existence—states that the most gratifying aspect of his job has been “seeing the impact of LEED and the greater USGBC community have made on the global green building industry.”

Since launching its Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) green certification program in 2000, more than 55,000 commercial projects spanning 10.1 billion sf, and more than 154,000 residential units around the world participate in LEED, with 1.7 million square feet of building space earning LEED certification every day. Nearly 200,000 LEED professional credential holders are engaged in advancing this global movement.

Last year, the United Nations honored USGBC with its Champions of the Earth award.

While he didn’t provide specifics about his future plans, the 60-year-old Fedrizzi says he would continue to work with the green building movement, and companies that can use his knowledge of green building practices, as a volunteer “in any way I can.”

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