Must see: Dumpster becomes a public space in art installation

During the installation's short life, documentaries were screened, bands performed, and a 3D printing workshop was held. 

December 05, 2014 |

Dumpsters tend to be seen as necessary evils of city life, but John H. Locke and Joaquin Reyes wanted New York City's residents to think about them in a different way. In an effort to change the way people thought about and interacted with public space in their urban environment, Locke and Reyes successfully crowdfunded the "Inflato Dumpster" on Kickstarter.

For five days this fall, the 165-square-meter installation was open to the public on one of New York City's streets. A dumpster on the bottom and an inflatable "hot-air balloon" piece on the top make up the structure. The inflatable top was created from biodegradable plastic and foil, the latter giving the structure's interior a glossy, reflective appearance.

During the installation's short life, documentaries were screened, bands performed, and a 3D printing workshop was held.

Locke told Pop Up City that Inflato Dumpster was a success because it made local residents curious about their environment and encouraged them to engage with it. 

 

Check out more images of Inflato Dumpster here.

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