Maryland’s Prince George County turns to P3s to build green infrastructure

County must convert 15,000 acres of impermeable surface area to capture stormwater runoff.

June 24, 2015 |
Maryland’s Prince George County turns to P3s to build green infrastructure

A new order was issued that requires Maryland's Prince George's County to clean up Chesapeak Bay. Image: Pixabay

Maryland's Prince George's County must comply with a federal "pollution diet" to clean up the Chesapeake Bay. Over the next 10 years, the county must convert 15,000 acres of watertight surfaces—almost 5% of the county's total area—into surfaces that absorb or treat rainwater. 

That will require adding some 46,000 stormwater devices. The county is turning to a novel approach to get the rain gardens, cisterns, permeable pavements, and other devices for filtering and absorbing stormwater built.

These features are geared to slow the rapid runoff from roads and rooftops in order to reduce pollution that flows into sewers and which then makes its way into the bay.

Its partnership with Corvias Solutions, which is in charge of designing, building, and maintaining the improvements, has been hired to convert 2,000 acres by 2017. If the company performs well, that amount could double. 

The county will also have its own team of workers to work on another 2,000 acres. Officials will be able compare the performance of the two teams and then decide how to proceed.

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