Frank Gehry creates fanciful brick façade for Australian business school

The fluid brickwork of the new Dr. Chau Chak Wing Building at the University of Technology, Sydney, is comprised of 320,000 pieces made by hand.

November 20, 2014 |
Photo credit: Andrew Worssam

Frank Gehry's first building in Australia, the Dr. Chau Chak Wing Building at the University of Technology, Sydney, has been completed. The building, primarily for use by the UTS business school, includes classrooms, a collaborative theater, a 240-seat auditorium, and a sculptural staircase made of stainless steel.  

On the east and west sides of the building, there are different façades designed to represent the past and the present, in a way. The eastern façade is made of waved brick to reference the area's sandstone heritage, while the western façade is made of glass panels to remind viewers of the building's contemporary context, according to designboom.

The fluid brickwork of the eastern façade is comprised of 320,000 pieces made by hand. Some of the bricks protrude from the façade, creating a pattern within the structure's larger geometry. Five custom forms had to be made to achieve the fluid effect of the façade. The windows are gridded and project outward, presenting a contrast with the building's mass.

The name of the $180 million building comes from the Australian-Chinese businessman and philanthropist, Dr. Chau Chak Wing, who donated $20 million for its construction. Wing also donated $5 million for the creation of an endowment fund for Australia-China scholarships.

 

 

Photo credit: Andrew Worssam, courtesy UTS

 



Photo credit: Andrew Worssam, courtesy UTS

 



Photo credit: Andrew Worssam, courtesy UTS

 



Photo credit: Andrew Worssam, courtesy UTS

 



Photo credit: Andrew Worssam, courtesy UTS

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