Special Report: K-12 school security in the wake of Sandy Hook

BD+C's exclusive five-part report on the state of K-12 school security one year after the Sandy Hook tragedy.

January 10, 2014 |
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Building Design+Construction's exclusive five-part report on K-12 school security offers proven design advice, technology recommendations, and thoughtful commentary on how Building Teams can help school districts prevent, or at least mitigate, a Sandy Hook on their turf.

 

 

 

 

 

Can design prevent another Sandy Hook?

Our experts say no, but it could save lives. In this report, they offer recommendations on security design you can bring to your K-12 clients to prevent, or at least mitigate, a Sandy Hook on their turf. Read part one.

 

 

16 recommendations on security technology to take to your K-12 clients

From facial recognition cameras to IP-based door hardware, here are key technology-related considerations you should discuss with your school district clients. Read part two.

 

 

AEC professionals weigh in on school security

An exclusive survey reveals that Building Teams are doing their part to make the nation’s schools safer in the aftermath of the Sandy Hook tragedy. Read the article.

 

 

How security in schools applies to other building types

Many of the principles and concepts described in our Special Report on K-12 security also apply to other building types and markets. Read part four.

 

 

What the states should do to prevent more school shootings

To tell the truth, I didn’t want to write about the terrible events of December 14, 2012, when 20 children and six adults were gunned down at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. I figured other media would provide ample coverage, and anything we did would look cheap or inappropriate. But two things turned me around. Read Robert Cassidy's commentary.

 

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