Why you should start with a builder, part three

We had worked together for 30 years. As a long-standing client of mine, he and I had gone through many projects together. And we were approaching another project, one that would forever change how he viewed our working relationship. As my customer and I sat down to talk about the project details, he told me something that would stay with me for weeks. “Kim, I’m going to have to get other bids on this just so I have peace of mind.”

March 11, 2014 |
Kim Mulder

We had worked together for 30 years. As a long-standing client of mine, he and I had gone through many projects together. And we were approaching another project, one that would forever change how he viewed our working relationship.

As my customer and I sat down to talk about the project details, he told me something that would stay with me for weeks.

“Kim, I’m going to have to get other bids on this just so I have peace of mind.”

I didn’t like it, but what could I do? How could I explain that our working relationship equated to far more than what he could see at his bottom line?

A few weeks later, after giving it some thought, I drove to his office. 

“Kim, what’s on your mind?” he asked.

“You said you had to go out for other bids,” I answered.

“Well, it’s a large project. I wanted to make sure your numbers were right,” he explained.

And that’s where the big misconception happens: thinking you are comparing apples to apples. What he had yet to realize was that the bottom line will never tell the whole story. 

“You know it isn’t all about my price,” I said.

“What do you mean?” He wanted to understand and so I outlined it.

“Why am I meeting with the civil engineers to discuss construction work I’m not even doing for you? Why am I meeting with the Ohio EPA on a different project of installing a septic system? And why am I meeting every morning with the construction worker moving all this dirt to tell him what to do when you’re the one who hired him? It’s not about price; it’s about these intangible things that I never charge you for providing.”

My customer stayed quiet a few moments before he finally spoke. “Kim, every four or five years you need to remind me of the added value I may not see. Just get my building done for a fair price and let’s move on with it.”

And we did.

Choosing the right builder often means looking beyond the price.

Ten years ago, a friend of mine moved from Ohio to Florida and decided to build a house. He called me up one day asking for advice on how to choose between the four contractors who had bid the job. So I asked him, “Which one of the four do you see you and your wife being friends with after the house is done?”

When he thought about that, the choice was simple. And today, 10 years later, he is still friends with his builder.

Does that method always work? No. You may not necessarily click right away with one builder or another. In instances like that, your best bet is to work with a contractor who is honest.

How can you tell?

Choose the one who is authentic. Authenticity can’t be faked. You know it when you meet it. Pick the contractor who is upfront about any challenges, who doesn’t sugar coat or downplay the price, but who tells you the situation straight on. That’s how I always do business and why 60 to 70 percent of my business is repeat customers, some who have been with me since 1976.

That’s who you want. And, who knows, once the project is completed you may become friends after all.

Read more from the Starbuildings blog. And catch up on part one and part two of the series.

Kim Mulder | Metal Building Trends
Star, Inc.
President

Kim joined Star in 1977 after working in the home building industry. He started as a carpenter and quickly advanced to project superintendent, proving his natural leadership ability. Soon, Kim was promoted into sales and estimating and, with his prior experience in the field, had the ability to excel in the planning, estimating and construction of award-winning projects. Kim’s “can do” attitude proves to be a positive reinforcement for the entire STAR team.  He is a self-motivator, always looks ahead, and always makes the best of any situation.

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