Codes and Standards
Dwight Perkins is the Senior Director of Field Operations for the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) and orchestrates the code adoption efforts of 11 other IAPMO Field Service regions as well as directly working with the state code agencies in Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada and Oregon. Mr. Perkins has more than 35 years experience in the plumbing industry starting as an Apprentice in Alaska moving through the ranks to become a Journeyman Plumber and Business Manager of with UA Local 262. Prior to joining IAPMO, Perkins served in the City and Borough of Juneau Assembly while worked as Deputy Commissioner for the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development. He is extremely familiar with the demands jurisdictions face on a daily basis and he is particularly well suited to address those needs. Mr. Perkins may be contacted at IAPMO at 503-982-1193 or email dwight.perkins@IAPMO.org
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Most real estate, construction executives support building energy-efficiency legislation

October 30, 2012

Although few business leaders are fond of government regulation of their industry, 75% of real estate and construction leaders say that building energy-efficiency legislation is beneficial to their business, according to a global survey by the Economist Intelligence Unit commissioned by the Global Buildings Performance Network (GBPN).

There is clear evidence, the survey found, that the message of energy efficiency being good for business is gaining momentum across the building sector. 63% of respondents say that energy efficiency influences their investment decisions. More than 50% of respondents are ready to tolerate payback on efficiency measures that takes five years or longer.

Legislation is a way to level the playing field, thus strengthening the business case for energy investments, the survey suggests. 68% of respondents say that carbon taxes are helpful to drive investments in efficient buildings. And the same proportion believes that global agreements limiting carbon emissions would create a level playing field. More than a third of respondents (34%) say a lack of enforcement of existing regulations is a leading obstacle to investments in energy efficiency.

Another interesting finding: Many companies are ill-informed about energy realities and the true cost of energy consumption. One-third of respondents underestimated the financial significance of energy consumption in their own businesses. Many are also unclear about the costs of constructing highly energy-efficient buildings. While the actual additional costs vary between 5% to 15%, two-thirds of respondents overestimate the cost, saying that energy-efficient buildings cost 15% more than a standard construction.

(http://www.imt.org/news/the-current/executives-across-the-world-are-ready-to-go-deep-with-energy-efficiency)

         
 
 

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