Metal makes its mark on interior spaces

Beyond its long-standing role as a preferred material for a building’s structure and roof, metal is making its mark on interior spaces as well. 

November 15, 2013 |
Gene Bell

Image courtesy Advanced Technology Inc.

Beyond its long-standing role as a preferred material for a building’s structure and roof, metal is making its mark on interior spaces as well.

A recent Metal Architecture article highlights metal as an increasingly popular alternative for architects and interior designers of commercial environments.

From the article: “Metal's versatility opens it up to virtually limitless applications, while delivering durability and longevity that surpasses many other interior materials. It blends function, form, beauty and style.”

The article explains that recent technological advances have made architectural metals a practical solution for interiors, with new finishes, coatings and patterns available to suit diverse architectural styles. Metal surfacing has become popular for use as wall coverings, column covers, room dividers and stairways. It’s a particularly attractive option for settings with high-traffic areas and multiple levels.

Metal ceiling panels in public areas are also growing in popularity, as they are VOC-free and do not contribute any airborne particles that would negatively affect the building's indoor air quality.

“Future architectural metals advances are on the horizon that will give even more product choices to architects and designers looking for a dramatic wall, column or ceiling treatment for a signature project,” the article states. “Insiders predict new photovoltaic coatings for metal that will retain sunlight and other energies that can be redirected at night to illuminate rooms, even entire buildings. New finishes such as powder coatings will produce realistic wood grain finishes producing scenic ceilings with images of clouds and tree branches. Future interior metal systems could even help buildings resist earthquake movements.”

Read more from Metal Architecture.

Gene Bell | Metal Building Trends

Gene Bell, P.E. joined Star in 1973 as a Design Engineer I after earning his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Oklahoma.  Gene has worked as Design Engineer, Sales Engineer, Chief Engineer, Chief Sales Engineer, Manager of Estimating, Team Manager, Director of Customer Service, Director of Estimating, Pricing Administration and Plant Scheduling and is now the Vice President of Operations.  When not working, Gene enjoys golfing, running, kayaking, adventure racing, mountain biking and spending as much time as possible with his nine grandchildren.

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